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Author: David Stirrup

Louise Erdrich is one of the most critically and commercially successful Native American writers. This book is a fully comprehensive treatment of her writing, analysing the textual complexities and diverse contexts of her work to date. Drawing on the critical archive relating to Erdrich's work and Native American literature, it explores the full depth and range of her authorship. Breaking Erdrich's oeuvre into several groupings – poetry, early and late fiction, memoir and children's writing – it develops individual readings of both the critical arguments and the texts themselves. The book argues that Erdrich's work has developed an increasing political acuity to the relationship between ethics and aesthetics in Native American literature, and her insistence on being read as an American writer is shown to be in constant and mutually inflecting dialogue with her Ojibwe heritage.

Authorship and authority
David Stirrup

of literature that combines irony and pathos, complexity of plot and sophistication of language, deft narrative turns and searching philosophical and ethical conundrums. Many critics have declared her to be among the most important late twentieth-/early twenty-first-century Native American writers, while P. Jane Hafen (Taos Pueblo) comments that her work manifests ‘a Chippewa experience in the context of the European American novelistic tradition’ (1999b). It is ultimately that ability to depict what many understand as ‘Chippewa experience’, while innovatively

in Louise Erdrich
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Maria Holmgren Troy, Elizabeth Kella, and Helena Wahlström

of a hegemonic American identity since Toqueville – precisely that identity that became unsettled and shaken in the years immediately prior to and contemporary with the novels we study.2 Despite demographic and cultural changes in the USA, including the rise of transnational and transracial adoption as well as trends in cross-ethnic, transatlantic, and hemispheric studies, understandings of making home in the USA continue to be informed by ideas of racial differences between these three groups. Our selection includes novels by Native American writers Linda Hogan

in Making home
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Ireland’s ‘ABC of earth wonders’
Derek Gladwin and Christine Cusick

mud on its boots’.31 Robinson’s geographically place-based practices must understand the technical, imaginative and material elements of examination. The most important part, however, is the experiential, 7 8 Derek Gladwin and Christine Cusick where the map-maker, and writer in many cases, has muddy boots from literally traversing landscapes. This is why he insists on walking the terrain as part of his own process, one that Eamonn Wall, drawing from the Native American writer William Least Heat-Moon, refers to as ‘deep-mapping’ – a way of capturing the memories

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Texts, intertexts, and contexts
Maria Holmgren Troy, Elizabeth Kella, and Helena Wahlström

changing needs of colonists and settlers. Countering the projections and stereotypes of Indians generated by Euro-Americans remains important. In Chapter 2, we focus on how Native American writers use Indian orphans to counter the idea of regeneration through violence with an indigenous alternative of regeneration through kinship, exemplifying that shift via detailed study of two novels. Slotkin’s critique challenged many values associated with the American Adam, but did little to counter the masculinist bias of American literary criticism, which continued to gender

in Making home
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The Love Medicine tetralogy and Tales of Burning Love
David Stirrup

the novel; Eleanor’s hope alludes to the novel itself, Erdrich’s account. It is tempting to read this as an echo of Erdrich’s position as a Native American writer attempting to ‘write into’ a dual cultural heritage and against hegemonic representation, where the impermanence of writing in the window-ice stands in creative tension with Eleanor’s notebook. 27 Yet Eleanor herself is a white Euroamerican. Instead, her attempts to write are acts of recovery and survival, on the literal level, so that she does not die , and on the socio

in Louise Erdrich