Abstract only
Writing queer transnational South Asian art histories

According to the author, queer as an identification and subjectivity is important to his writing of transnational South Asian art histories. This book talks about new transnational South Asian art histories, to make visible histories of artworks that remain marginalised within the discipline of art history. This is done through a deliberate 'productive failure', by not upholding the strictly genealogical approach. The book discusses authorship by examining the writing about the work of Anish Kapoor to explore the shifting manner in which critics and art historians have identified him and his work. It focuses on the author's own identification as queer and South Asian American to put pressure on the coherency of an LGBTQI art history. It connects formal similarities of abstract work produced in the 1960s in New York City by Cy Twombly and Natvar Bhavsar. The book deals with an art history that concerns facile categories such as South Asian/non-South Asian and black/white, and discusses the works of Stephen Dean, Mario Pfeifer, Adrian Margaret Smith Piper, and Kehinde Wiley. It focuses on practice-led research by discussing 'Sphere:dreamz,; which was produced by queer-identified South Asian women. Continuing the focus, the book looks at the multi-site exhibition 'Mixing It Up: Queering Curry Mile and Currying Canal Street', organised by the author in 2007. It addresses the question of how certain subjects are considered as 'belonging' and others as not; and the role of art in the reconstitution of notions of 'home' and transnational South Asian art histories.

Abstract only
Queer zen

history, or history of Abstract Expressionism if we focused on queer form and the ‘subjectless’?24 Answering this question has led me (somewhat surprisingly) to the abstract works from the 1960s and 1970s of Cy Twombly (1928–2011) and Natvar Bhavsar (b. 1934) and their interlocutors. At first glance, I admit they are curious bedfellows. While Bhavsar’s works could be enfolded into a history of artworks of artists of Asian descent since he was born in India and lives in New York City, Twombly’s works could not. Moreover, neither of these individuals is queer

in Productive failure
Abstract only

Anish Kapoor, 1000 Names, 1979–80. Wood, gesso and pigment, dimensions variable. 1  2  Cy Twombly, Ferragosto II, 1961. Oil, oil crayon and pencil on canvas, 64¾ × 78⅞ in. (164.5 × 200.3 cm). Natvar Bhavsar, VAATRI, 1969. Pigment, oil and acrylic on canvas, 108 × 192 in. 3  Natvar Bhavsar, THEER-A-THEER-A, 1969. Pure pigment, oil and acrylic on canvas, 81.5 × 360 in. 4  Stephen Dean, Stills from Pulse, 2001. Video installation, sound, 7:20 min. 5  Mario Pfeifer, A Formal Film in Nine Episodes, Prologue & Epilogue, 2010. 35 mm film transferred to HD

in Productive failure
Abstract only
Towards creolizing transnational South Asian art histories

artworks by artists of Asian descent living in the United States.74 To productively open up both of these art histories beyond social constructions of identity and genealogy, I focus on connecting formal similarities of abstract work produced in the 1960s in New York City by Cy Twombly and Natvar Bhavsar. Given the dominant interpretive models for post-Second World War art movements that emphasize form at the expense of inclusion of work by artists of Asian descent, this chapter also serves to reimagine this period in art history. 11 12 Productive failure Chapter 4

in Productive failure