Search results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • "Negro Education Grant" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Education in the British Empire, 1830–1910
Author: Felicity Jensz

Nineteenth-century evangelical Protestant missionary groups commonly assumed that they were the most apt providers of education to non-Europeans in British colonies. Christian schooling was deemed imperative for modernising societies to withstand secularising forces. This significant study examines this assumption by drawing on key moments in the development of missionary education from the 1830s to the beginning of the twentieth century. The book is the first to survey the changing ideologies behind establishing mission schools across the spectrum of the British Empire. It examines the Negro Education Grant in the West Indies, the Aborigines Select Committee (British Settlements), missionary conferences in 1860 and 1910 as well as drawing on local voices and contexts from Southern Africa, British India and Sri Lanka to demonstrate the changing expectations for, engagement with and ideologies circulating around mission schools resulting from government policies and local responses. By the turn of the twentieth century, many colonial governments had encroached upon missionary schooling to such an extent that the symbiosis that had allowed missionary groups autonomy at the beginning of the century had morphed into an entanglement that secularised mission schools. The spread of ‘Western modernity’ through mission schools in British colonies affected local cultures and societies. It also threatened Christian religious moral authority, leading missionary societies by the World Missionary Conference in Edinburgh in 1910 to question the ambivalent legacy of missionary schooling, and to fear for the morality and religious sensibilities of their pupils, and indeed for morality within Britain and the Empire.

The Negro Education Grant and Nonconforming missionary societies in the 1830s
Felicity Jensz

In his 1838 report to the House of Commons, London, on his inspection tour of schools funded by the Negro Education Grant in the West Indies, Charles Joseph Latrobe was clear as to his position that: ‘I have never forgotten that the special object aimed at by the measures adopted by Her Majesty’s Government was the moral and religious improvement of the Negro population

in Missionaries and modernity
The Select Committee on Aborigines (British Settlements)
Felicity Jensz

With the introduction of the Negro Education Grant in the West Indies, the Imperial government demonstrated its commitment to the ‘moral, intellectual, and religious improvement’ 2 of its non-European denizens through collaborative work with the Established and Nonconformist Churches. It was in the metropole that the anti-slavery campaigners drew the most support for

in Missionaries and modernity
Abstract only

constant in this flux was the belief held by evangelical Protestant missionary groups that they were best placed to provide education to non-Europeans in the colonies and with it access to missionary modernity. From the instigation of the Negro Education Grant in the 1830s, missionary schooling in the colonies was increasingly undertaken with the support of colonial governments, yet this relationship was not

in Missionaries and modernity
Abstract only
Felicity Jensz

Nonconformist missionaries in the colonies affected their standing in the metropole, as revealed by the preceding discussions of the introduction of the Negro Education Grant in the West Indies in the 1830s. Nonconformists positioned themselves as potential partners for the imperial government in the provision of schooling to emancipated slaves and in doing so gained legitimacy for their work, which could be

in Missionaries and modernity
Felicity Jensz

terminology from ‘religious and moral education’ in relation to the Negro Education Grant to that of ‘religious instruction and education’ in the Select Committee (Aborigines Committee). A further and more formalised split occurred between secular and religious subjects from the mid-nineteenth century, as colonial governments increasingly dictated what was to be taught in grant-in-aid schools. I argue that

in Missionaries and modernity
Abstract only
Freedom, laissez-faire and the state after Britain’s abolition of slavery
Richard Huzzey

as rhetoric, it would be the education of freed people. From 1835 to 1845, Britain spent an average of £20,000 a year on a Negro Education Grant.39 A little of the money assigned to support clergy, £23,000 a year until 1868, also went towards schools for black West Indians, though most efforts died away with the British government’s grant.40 The brief decade of schooling was founded, as the first inspector of schools suggested, on a belief that ‘[w]hatever objection may exist in more advanced societies to the principle of compulsory education’, the need to train

in Emancipation and the remaking of the British imperial world