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Rob Manwaring

2 Labour, democratic renewal and the New Social Democracy In Britain and Australia, Labour governments have been ­experimenting with democratic renewal. Democratic renewal includes a range of diverse activities, processes and mechanisms and can include constitutional reform, increasing the transparency of government d ­ ecision-making, activating new forms of civic engagement and introducing new spaces for public debate. This book looks at one strand of this search for democratic renewal: a growing willingness by Labour ­ governments to introduce new mechanisms

in The search for democratic renewal
Social welfare for the twenty-first century

Social democracy has made a political comeback in recent years, especially under the influence of the ‘Third Way’. Not everyone is convinced, however, that ‘Third Way’ social democracy is the best means of reviving the Left's project. This book considers this dissent and offers an alternative approach. Bringing together a range of social and political theories, it engages with some contemporary debates regarding the present direction and future of the Left. Drawing upon egalitarian, feminist and environmental ideas, the book proposes that the social democratic tradition can be renewed but only if the dominance of conservative ideas is challenged more effectively. It explores a number of issues with this aim in mind, including justice, the state, democracy, new technologies, future generations and the advances in genetics.

The politics of consultation in Britain and Australia
Author: Rob Manwaring

This book attempts to understand how two sister centre-left parties, the British Labour Party and the Australian Labor Party (ALP), have sought to adapt to the modern era and effect changes. It identifies and examines a range of drivers for Labour's desire to experiment and find new forms of citizen engagement. Linked to the influence of the New Social Democracy (NSD) is the lingering legacy of the new public management (NPM) reforms implemented in the public sectors in both countries. For Labour, democratic renewal is an attempt to secure wider legitimacy in neoliberal settings; similarly, the NSD is also linked to the debates about the perceived shift from government to governance. The NSD has attempted to respond to these debates and in Britain a concerted effort has been made to reformulate the role of the state and, by extension, civil society. The book examines how far the NSD has influenced Labour governments in Britain and Australia. It establishes Labour's interest in democratic renewal, specifically, the role of political participation and civic engagement in the wider context of democratic theory. Given that the NSD calls for an 'active citizenry', this is important. A central motif of democratic theory is an ambivalence about the role of political participation in a modern liberal democratic polity. The book explores how far New Social Democratic governments in Britain and Australia have been successful in seeking to link new forms of public dialogue to existing democratic decision-making processes in the modern western world.

Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

evading the conceptual barriers between Left and Right, public and private, state and market, justice and efficiency, security and flexibility, equality and freedom. It is this radicalisation that Giddens refers to as the NSD.1 By transcending these dichotomies – rather than simply trading off between them – we provide ourselves with an alternative not only to the ‘Old Left’ and ‘New Right’, but also to the siren TZP1 4/25/2005 12 4:49 PM Page 12 After the new social democracy calls of nationalist, ethnic and religious fundamentalists. For if we can find a way to

in After the new social democracy
Abstract only
Rob Manwaring

settings is the so-called Third Way. Anthony Giddens, often seen (inaccurately) as its architect, and other adherents prefer the term ‘New Social Democracy’ (NSD). The New Social Democracy is a useful descriptor for understanding one strand of revisionist social democratic politics in Britain and Australia. A central part of the New Social Democracy is a call for democratic renewal, or what Giddens terms ‘the democratising of democracy’. Inherent in this call is that the existing architecture of representative democracy is no longer sufficient for meeting the needs of a

in The search for democratic renewal
Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

appeals to some notion of proceduralism (see below) where what is important is common adherence to just rules rather than the manipulation of outcomes, yet without the prominence that market libertarians give to entitlement, since reciprocity preserves the notion of moral desert (cf. Gauthier, 1986). Procedural justice Here, the most convincing account remains that of Nozick (1974) who contrasts procedural theory with ‘end-state’ theories of justice. Procedural- TZP2 4/25/2005 36 4:50 PM Page 36 After the new social democracy ism is concerned with the means that

in After the new social democracy
Tony Fitzpatrick

point in mind we can proceed to a brief overview of Bauman’s account of globalisation, since Bauman captures very succinctly TZP3 4/25/2005 54 4:51 PM Page 54 After the new social democracy the kind of social and spatial polarities that are crucial to understanding the security state and so to understanding recent developments in the US and UK. I will be assuming that globalisation is an economic, political and social reality, but one that can accommodate a much wider range of ideological trajectories than those proposed by conservatives and new social

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

in the tendency to regard liberal democracy as the final stage of modernity, rather than as a key but transitional stage in the democratisation of society. This assumption is latent within Marshall’s famous account, where social rights are thought to complete the journey towards full citizenship such that the conjunction of market, democratic and welfarist institutions represents TZP9 4/25/2005 178 4:57 PM Page 178 After the new social democracy the summit of the modern project (Marshall and Bottomore, 1992). Whatever the specifics of Marshall’s theory, he

in After the new social democracy
Rob Manwaring

5 New Social Democratic governments in Britain and Australia Yet Gillard’s reinstatement of the centrality of markets leaves Labor with some dilemmas that Rudd’s trenchant critiques of neo-liberalism had  at  least sought to address. For, if there are no significant problems  with  relying on markets then why do we need social democratic parties? Carol Johnson, 2011 The New Social Democracy in Australia and Britain This chapter introduces four cases of the New Social Democracy in action. It describes the Australian roots of the NSD and ­reinforces the renewed

in The search for democratic renewal
Rob Manwaring

to Oscar Wilde The New Social Democracy in its variant forms in both Australia and Britain is experimenting with the ideas of participation, ­democracy and consultation. In both countries, there is willingness by c­ entre-left ­governments to search for new mechanisms to enable citizen ­engagement with the policy-making process. As outlined in the ­previous ­chapter, these are responses to both the dominance of ­ neoliberalism and the impact of the new public management. While there has been a proliferation of such initiatives in many countries (see Barnes et al

in The search for democratic renewal