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Norse Terror in the Late Eighteenth to Early Nineteenth Centuries
Robert Rix

Antiquarian efforts to revive Old Norse poetry brought about an interest in Germanic superstition that could be exploited by literary writers. This article examines a subspecies of terror writing which took inspiration from Norse literature. Compared to the Catholic settings of many Gothic novels, Norse-inflected writing provided an alternative. It is a little known fact that the Old Norse religion and literature was used as a prism through which Britains ethnically Gothic past could be viewed and negotiated. The article discusses some examples of how the fashion for thrills was combined with a national project to recover a sense of ancestral heroism.

Gothic Studies
Rafał Borysławski

riddle form, in conjunction with its use for the training of memory, was employed in ancient and medieval didactic dialogues composed as sets of questions and answers. Such dialogues, competitive exchanges of often enigmatic questions and answers, were widespread in the literatures of the early medieval Europe, and include the Solomon and Saturn dialogues, 3 the didactic disputation between Alcuin and Pippin, Charlemagne’s son, 4 and the contests of wits in the Poetic Edda 5 and Hervarar saga , 6 from Old English, Latin and Old Norse traditions respectively

in Riddles at work in the early medieval tradition
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Bede on the Flood
Daniel Anlezark

suggest the ongoing need to counter an inherited pagan cosmology in the post-conversion period. While it is difficult to determine with certainty the extent of the influence of Christian cosmology on Old Norse traditions of the world’s end before these themselves came to be committed to writing, other evidence strongly suggests that pre-Christian Germanic peoples shared certain apocalyptic beliefs

in Water and fire
Daniel Anlezark

’s action with the myth of the Flood. A wide range of analogues have been suggested for the mere, and some for the dwelling which is reached through its waters. Among the more striking parallels are those between the Grendel-kin’s hall and analogues from the Old Norse tradition, not least the cave behind the waterfall in Grettis saga , which includes a reference to a sax (short

in Water and fire