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Wendy R. Childs
and
Phillipp R. Schofield

1322 was a little over £1,000, this was an extraordinary change in the condition of the royal finances. 15 His overwhelming victory in 1322 offered Edward the opportunity to rule, for the first time, as he chose. A first and significant act was to repeal the Ordinances of 1311, a symbol of restraint on his authority and opposition to his rule which Edward now rejected with contemptuous haste. The main

in The reign of Edward II, 1307–27
Abstract only
Wendy R. Childs
and
Phillipp R. Schofield

the king. Memorandum. The above letters were read and sealed before the king, the king himself commanding them to be sealed … 3 The Ordinances of 1311 (a) The Statute of Stamford, 1309 The Annals of London record the Statute of Stamford and its context; the original text is also available in Statutes, I, pp. 154–6. 26 Annales

in The reign of Edward II, 1307–27
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Wendy R. Childs
and
Phillipp R. Schofield

In this chapter the editors first set out some of the broad themes and key developments in terms of royal finance. Following a general discussion of the wider economic context of the reign, royal finances and opportunities for the raising of revenue are considered. The management of royal finance, including reform of the exchequer is also discussed. Documents of relevance to historical understanding of the early fourteenth-century economy, including price and export data and contemporary reflection on dearth and famine are presented; sources relating to the raising of royal revenue, attempts to constrain the king’s authority in this area, and reform of the exchequer are also included in this chapter.

in The reign of Edward II, 1307–27
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Wendy R. Childs
and
Phillipp R. Schofield

In this chapter, sources relevant to the early-fourteenth century parliament are reviewed and presented; a general view of the changing nature of parliament in this period is offered as is contemporary reflection on the administration of parliament and its significance, including important tracts on parliament and its officers.

in The reign of Edward II, 1307–27
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The intersection of power, perception, and sexual morality in the careers of Piers Gaveston and the ‘royal favourites’ of fourteenth-century England
Audrey Covert

. 37 Vita , ed. Childs, 34–35: ‘quod Petrus de Gauestone dominum regem male duxit, domino regi male consuluit, et ipsum ad male faciendum deceptorie et multiformiter induxit’. See also Michael Prestwich, ed., ‘A New Version of the Ordinances of 1311’, Historical Research 57 (2007), n. xxix. 38 Parliament Rolls, Edward II , 1376 April

in Premodern ruling sexualities
Anthony Musson
and
Edward Powell

attempting to limit the power of a king who had become tyrannical or unjust. [ 1.13 ] Practical attempts during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries to restrain the king’s prerogative power and achieve reform can be seen in the Provisions of Oxford of 1258, the Ordinances of 1311 and the Continual Council of 1386, where the government administration was entrusted to a body of magnates and officials

in Crime, Law and Society in the Later Middle Ages
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Wendy R. Childs
and
Phillipp R. Schofield

Gaveston’s killers no credit for their act or justification under the pretext of the Ordinances of 1311. In fact, the very issuance of a pardon makes clear that their action was beyond, rather than according to, the law. 2 The restoration of formal relations between Edward and his opponents permitted and, indeed, demanded some return to the normal business of government. Most

in The reign of Edward II, 1307–27
Medieval history in parliamentarian polemic, 1641–42
Jason Peacey

House of Commons, and to highlight the possibility of deposing, electing and binding monarchs, rather than merely dealing with evil counsellors. It is apparent that the example of Richard II – as opposed to evidence relating to the Ordinances of 1311 or Edward II’s removal from the throne in 1327 – became particularly pertinent from the summer of 1642 onwards. Medieval history provided contemporaries with different tools for different purposes, and by observing how different pieces of evidence were deployed at different moments, as well as how the meaning of

in Writing the history of parliament in Tudor and early Stuart England
Open Access (free)
Coding same-sex union in Amis and Amiloun
Sheila Delany

the anagnorisis. Curiously, he is not denounced as a thief but as a traitor (2045, 2077) – a specifically political offence – and said to be worthy a traitor’s punishment: drawing (that is, being dragged by a horse around the city). This punishment was a not uncommon public spectacle in London and other cities. Piers Gaveston was accused in the baronial Ordinances of 1311 of having appropriated royal treasure and sent it abroad, to the impoverishment of the kingdom. This charge was repeated in 1312, after Gaveston’s murder as a traitor, in connection with a hoard of

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Anthony Musson

. Turning now to the legal element itself. The word ‘legal’ carries the obvious implication that we are talking about ‘lawyers’, but what ‘legal’ qualities were apparent among the men attending parliament? In the fourteenth century there was a general view that parliament comprised at least some men possessing legal knowledge: for example, c. 38 of the Ordinances of 1311 stated that any doubtful provisions

in Medieval law in context