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Jacques Rivette remains undoubtedly the least well known of all the major figures in French cinema associated with the New Wave of the late 1950s and early 1960s. This is demonstrated by the fact that, although retrospectives of Rivette's films have been held in London, Paris and New York in recent years, the first book-length monograph on Rivette's work was only published in 2001 and, until now, none has been published in English. In the 1970s, Rivette directed his best loved and most enduring film, the inexhaustible, irrepressible Céline et Julie vont en bateau. This book begins with a consideration of Rivette's work as a film critic. It focuses on the apparently paradoxical nature of much of Rivette's criticism, a quality perhaps best captured in the seemingly opposed universes of two of Rivette's favourite directors: Roberto Rossellini, on the one hand, Fritz Lang, on the other. The existence of conspiratorial organisations is often suggested only to be denied in Rivette's narratives (Paris nous appartient, Out 1, and Le Pont du Nord), but frequently the atmosphere of unease generated by the film's visual and aural register serves to maintain questions and uncertainties in the mind of the spectator. The function and significance of the jeu de l'oie, and its eerie similarity to the map of Rivette's beloved city/labyrinth, have been amply discussed. The book also includes discussions on Rivette's works such as Histoire de Marie et Julien, L'Amour par terre, La Belle Noiseuse, and Secret Défense.

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Games and play
Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

, Out 1 , adding that his choice of play as guiding principle was in reaction to his previous film, L’Amour fou , and its ‘false authenticity’ (côté faussement vécu). But if Out 1 is a key ‘play-text’ in Rivette’s work, it is not the first of his films to give a privileged position to one or other of the senses of jeu – a polyvalent word which, apart from most of the functions of the English ‘play

in Jacques Rivette
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Space as story
Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

’ 1 (Ogier 1982 : 16). The title of Paris nous appartient speaks for itself; the city remains a persistent presence through the ramifications of Out 1 (1971), parts of Céline et Julie vont en bateau (1974), and Duelle (1976). After le Pont du Nord , the city plays a smaller, but still significant, role in Haut bas fragile (1995), and Va savoir (2001), although its choreographic power is less evident in these

in Jacques Rivette
John Carter Wood

for the social order and ‘Christian thinkers’ to ‘blend theological thought with sociological knowledge’. 51 Oldham agreed but complained to Temple that, unfortunately, ‘some of the theologians’ were the ‘most stupid’ about faith and society: their rarefied ‘theological atmosphere’ was remote from ‘the actual world’. 52 Nonetheless, five theological influences on the group stand out: (1) domestic traditions of ‘liberalism’; (2) the ‘Christian realism’ of Reinhold Niebuhr; (3) the neo-Thomist philosophy of Jacques Maritain; (4) ‘continental’ Protestant theology

in This is your hour
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Narrative, conspiracy, community
Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

and organised crime that is central to Debord’s critique of the integrated spectacular. In an interview at the time of Le Pont du Nord , Rivette admitted that this film, like Paris nous appartient and Out 1 (1970), really needs to be labelled with the date of its shooting since it attempts to provide a portrait of Paris at a particular moment in history (Rivette 1981 : 12). Paris nous appartient caught the mood of

in Jacques Rivette
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Resisting racism in times of national security
Editor: Asim Qureshi

In times of national security, scholars and activists who hail from the communities under suspicion attempt to draw readers and listeners to the complexity of the world we inhabit. For those who campaigned against the SUS law in the 1980s, when young Black men were being routinely stopped in the streets, the wave of counter-terrorism legislation and policy that exists today will be very familiar. Similarly, recent discussions about the impact of drill music in the culture of young Black men has drawn questions around the ways in which they should be securitised, with senior police calling for the use of terrorism legislation against them. In this environment, when those who study and have lived alongside the communities who are at the scrutiny of the state raise questions about the government, military and police policy, they are often shut down as terrorist-sympathisers, or apologists for gang culture. In such environments, there is an expectation on scholars and activists to condemn what society at large fears. This volume is about how that expectation has emerged alongside the normalisation of racism, and how these writers choose to subvert the expectations raised on them, as part of their commitment to anti-racism.

Author: Ebun Joseph

With race as a central theme, this book presents racial stratification as the underlying system which accounts for the difference in outcomes of Whites and Blacks in the labour market. Critical race theory (CRT) is employed to discuss the operation, research, maintenance and impact of racial stratification. The power of this book is the innovative use of a stratification framework to expose the pervasiveness of racial inequality in the labour market. It teaches readers how to use CRT to investigate the racial hierarchy and it provides a replicable framework to identify the racial order based on insight from the Irish case. There is a four-stage framework in the book which helps readers understand how migrants navigate the labour market from the point of migration to labour participation. The book also highlights minority agency and how migrants respond to their marginality. The examples of how social acceptance can be applied in managing difference in the workplace are an added bonus for those interested in diversity and inclusion. This book is the first of its kind in Ireland and across Europe to present inequality, racism and discrimination in the labour market from a racial stratification perspective. While this book is based on Irish data, the CRT theoretical approach, as well as its insight into migrant perspectives, poses a strong appeal to scholars of sociology, social justice, politics, intercultural communication and economics with interest in race and ethnicity, critical whiteness and migration. It is a timely contribution to CRT which offers scholars a method to conduct empirical study of racial stratification across different countries bypassing the over-reliance on secondary data. It will also appeal to countries and scholars examining causal racism and how it shapes racial inequality.

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Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

turned to his infamous experiments with narrative duration and improvised performance, and, although these remain some of his strongest and most original films, their running times were designed to dissuade all but the most committed cinephiles: L’Amour fou (1969) was four and a quarter hours long. Out 1: Noli me tangere (1970), which lasts for some twelve hours and forty minutes, was originally designed as a series of

in Jacques Rivette
Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

, those films in which characters are involved explicitly with theatre as a major part of the narrative process ( Paris nous appartient, L’Amour fou, Out 1 (both versions), L’Amour par terre, La Bande des quatre, Va savoir ); on the other, those in which theatre and organised performance do not form part of a narrative which is, at least formally, conceived as unfolding in an unbounded ‘real’ world ( Le Coup du berger, La

in Jacques Rivette
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Arlette Jouanna

conclusion W as 24 August 1572 a decisive day in French history? Yes, without doubt. The Massacre signalled, once and for all, the end of the Protestants’ hope of converting the kingdom to their faith. France would not now be Protestant. Before the tragedy this had not been clear. In the early 1560s, especially, the country’s religious future could rightly seem uncertain, and the force of the new ideas was considerable. According to Blaise de Monluc, who was himself tempted, ‘there was no son of a good mother who did not want to try them out’.1 Many, driven by

in The Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre