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The Spanish Civil War in cinema
Author: David Archibald

This book charts the changing nature of cinematic depictions of the Spanish Civil War. In 1936, a significant number of artists, filmmakers and writers – from George Orwell and Pablo Picasso to Joris Ivens and Joan Miró – rallied to support the country's democratically elected Republican government. The arts have played an important role in shaping popular understandings of the Spanish Civil War, and the book examines the specific role cinema has played in this process. Its focus is on fictional feature films produced within Spain and beyond its borders between the 1940s and the early years of the twenty-first century – including Hollywood blockbusters, East European films, the work of the avant garde in Paris and films produced under Franco's censorial dictatorship.

Christopher Lloyd

6 Filming Picasso and Karajan This chapter deviates from the chronological sequence followed hitherto in order to consider the documentary films which Clouzot made with Pablo Picasso and Herbert von Karajan. Le Mystère Picasso was filmed at La Victorine studios in Nice from June to September 1955 and first shown at the Cannes festival in 1956, where it was awarded a special jury prize. Following the popular success of Le Salaire de la peur and Les Diaboliques (and the critical reservations which the second film had attracted), Clouzot was able to afford to undertake

in Henri-Georges Clouzot
Pablo Picasso’s Guernica
Duncan Wheeler

in London’s New Burlington Galleries were facilitated by the commercial success at the same space of the International Surrealist Exhibition in 1936 (paintings by Salvador Dalí, Henry Moore and Pablo Picasso, attracting nearly a thousand visits a day). 5 By contrast, an exhibition mounted around Guernica with all profits going towards the National Joint Committee for Spanish Relief closed after being seen by a relatively paltry 3,000 visitors. 6 It hit a stronger nerve once transported to the proletarian East End of the capital, with over 15,000 spectators

in Following Franco
Open Access (free)
Gertrude Stein and Alfred North Whitehead
Kate Fullbrook

quality of genius in them. The three geniuses of whom I wish to speak are Gertrude Stein, Pablo Picasso and Alfred Whitehead. I have met many important people, I have met several great people but I have only known three first class geniuses and in each case on sight within me something rang. In no one of the three cases have I been mistaken. In this way my new full life began.1 This famous, amusing passage is dense with various kinds of significance. Most importantly, it declares a judgment on whose work is important in the development of modernity with astonishing

in Special relationships
Social worlds and cultural positionings
Nadia Kiwan

‘upward mobility’ whereby the interviewees concerned try to distance themselves from the socio-economic community which surrounds them in order to ‘get ahead’ professionally and/or financially. Eight interviewees fall into this category (five young men and three young women). Twenty-two-year-old ‘Tayeb’ is studying for a BTS in Accountancy at the Cité scolaire Pablo Picasso in Aubervilliers. He was born in Algeria and has lived in Aubervilliers since the age of nine. He does not hold French nationality, but has recently requested naturalisation. Throughout the group

in Identities, discourses and experiences
Nadia Kiwan

certain links with her country and more particularly, her region ‘of origin’ (Kabylia). She cannot be described, however, as communautariste since her rejection of marriage as an institution suggests that she defines herself in rather individualised terms as well. Another interviewee who defines herself in ethnicised terms is Samira (twenty-four; part-time surveillante at the Collège Pablo Picasso; born in France; dual French–Algerian nationality). Once again, this mode of self-presentation comes to the fore when we discuss future marriage partners (see p. 136). For

in Identities, discourses and experiences
Abstract only
Duncan Wheeler

centralism are imprinted in Pablo Picasso’s Guernica , a painting ‘widely associated with the transition of a nation from dictatorship to democracy’. 7 If Catalan and Basque nationalists have long claimed that, to borrow a phrase from E. Inman Fox, ‘the problem of Spain was founded in Castilian primacy’, 8 the 2019 conviction of nine Catalan leaders by the Spanish Supreme Court for sedition has turned them into martyrs and showcased evidence of ‘a resurgent Spanish nationalism that has little propensity to recognize or the capacity to accommodate other nationalisms’. 9

in Following Franco
Lisa Florman

During the spring of 1913, Pablo Picasso produced a series of papiers collés in which we find, in addition to the pasted papers that are the works’ principal component, something even more unconventional: metal straight pins, each of them passing beneath the surface of the paper, only to re-emerge a short distance away. The series includes three compositions of heads (see Figure 14.1 ), all of them apparently male, and a lone landscape, the Paysage de Céret , now in the Musée Picasso in Paris (see Figure 14.2 ). However, the other seven works from the

in 1913: The year of French modernism
Kuba Szreder

embeds it within an idea of all users, geared against all forms of ownership (Wright 2013 ). Moreover, the apparatuses at play have clearly aesthetical components and these go on to inform and influence the modes of art that arise from repurposing. A good example of this process is Pablo Picasso's Guernica , the copies and fragments of which have been carried to thousands of peace demonstrations worldwide since the moment of its first presentation in the Republican Spanish pavilion during the World Exhibition in Paris in 1937. It is often exhibited as a masterpiece

in The ABC of the projectariat
Abstract only
Kuba Szreder

of facilitators and coordinators called subtramas, who worked at the Museum, have suggested that such activities negotiate between two different logics – of an institution and a movement – hybridising them both (subtramas et al. 2018 ). As Claire Bishop argues, museums can be radicalised by → repurposing the means at their disposal; for example, the Reina Sofia Museum's collection was rehung to contextualise Guernica by Pablo Picasso to tell the story of the anti-fascist struggles of the Spanish Civil War (Bishop and Perjovschi 2014 ). Similar ways of

in The ABC of the projectariat