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The genesis of Israeli policies of population management, surveillance and political control towards the Palestinian minority

Widely regarded as expert in techniques of surveillance and political control, Israel has been successful in controlling a native population for a long time. Despite tremendous challenges, it has maintained a tight grip over a large Palestinian population in the territories it occupied in the 1967 war. Moreover, it has effectively contained the Palestinian minority inside its 1948 borders. This book discusses the foundation of an Israeli discourse about the Palestinian minority, which Israeli leaders called birour or clarification, and the circumstances of its emergence and crystallization. It talks about the policy of constructing the Palestinians both as non-Jews and as an assortment of insular minorities. The fate of this minority was not only an Israeli internal affair but also an issue of concern to the international community. An analysis of the legal and institutional frameworks, and the role of state power in categorizing the Palestinians, follows. The book also analyses the ways state control and surveillance were implemented at the level of the locality. The book highlights the way state educational policy not just fostered the segmentation described earlier but promoted among students and educators. It then takes up the question of political rights and their meaning under the rule of Military Government. It concludes with personal reflections on the thousands of minutes, protocols, reports, plans and personal messages.

A veiled threat
Thomas J. Butko

–Israeli peace process as well as an instrument of political protest against an indigenous Arab regime. Hamas is an excellent case study with which to demonstrate the role religion performs in political conflict. Currently, Hamas is gaining in popular support due to renewed violence in the Middle East and the Palestinian population’s increased endorsement of suicide or ‘martyrdom’ operations against

in Redefining security in the Middle East
Place, space and discourse
Editors: Christine Agius and Dean Keep

Identity is often regarded as something that is possessed by individuals, states, and other agents. In this edited collection, identity is explored across a range of approaches and under-explored case studies with a view to making visible its fractured, contingent, and dynamic features. The book brings together themes of belonging and exclusion, identity formation and fragmentation. It also examines how identity functions in discourse, and the effects it produces, both materially and in ideational terms. Taking in case studies from Asia-Pacific, Europe, the Middle East and Latin America, the various chapters interrogate identity through formal governing mechanisms, popular culture and place. These studies demonstrate the complex and fluid nature of identity and identity practices, as well as implications for theorising identity.

Ilan Danjoux

wages to collapse while unemployment quadrupled (Kimmerling and Migdal 2003: 294). With no end in sight to Israeli rule and deteriorating living conditions, the brewing animosity and frustration within the Palestinian population exploded into the 1987 Intifada (uprising). The six years of sustained wide-scale protests against Israeli rule that ensued fundamentally altered Israeli attitudes towards

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Israel and a Palestinian state
Lenore G. Martin

democratic regime itself. On the other hand a potential source of opposition to the regime arises from the increased politicization of Israel’s Palestinian population, almost 20 per cent of its total population. 18 The political leadership within this population has been fragmented among the Israeli Communist Party, Arab nationalists, Islamists and others, and displays varying degrees of acceptance of

in Redefining security in the Middle East
Abstract only
Ahmad H. Sa’di

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/19/2013, SPi Introduction Widely regarded as an expert in techniques of surveillance and political control, Israel has been successful in controlling a native population for a long time. Despite tremendous challenges, it has maintained a tight grip over a large Palestinian population in the territories it occupied in the 1967 War. Moreover, it has effectively contained the Palestinian minority inside its 1948 borders. Although members of the latter group were granted Israeli citizenship, through various policies, they have been

in Thorough surveillance
Abstract only
Ilan Danjoux

matches, each a metonymic reference to a human being who could easily ignite the exposed fuse. Identifying the crowd is easy for those familiar with the prohibition against non-Muslims gathering for prayer on the Al-Aqsa compound. Geographic proximity to Palestinian population centres identifies the worshippers as Muslim Palestinians. However, it is the juxtaposition of these symbols that is central to

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Abstract only
Paul Kelemen

of emphasis in proPalestinian discourse from the armed struggle and anti-imperialism to human rights was made propitious by the 1967 war. The Palestinian population that had slipped out of Western consciousness after the 1948 war, once more commanded its attention by directly confronting Israeli military force in the West Bank and Gaza. But the radical left’s ideological retreat after the mid-1970s was a factor, too, in a broader realignment on the left over the Israel-Palestine conflict that drew its ideological ballast from the human rights agenda. There were

in The British left and Zionism
Paul Kelemen

areas that had been allotted to the Palestinian-Arab state. The Foreign Office, alarmed at the regional consequences of the disaster inflicted on the Palestinians, took steps to draw attention to the situation of the refugees, though Bevin had initially considered the Palestinian population’s expulsion from the area designated for the Jewish state by the UN as not entirely unwelcome. ‘It might be argued’, he wrote, ‘that the flight of large numbers of Arabs from the territory under Jewish administration had simplified the task of arriving at a stable settlement in

in The British left and Zionism
The case of Lebanon’s naturalised Palestinians
Hind Ghandour

been subjected to severe restriction in all areas of public and private life, including but not limited to employment, property law and the freedom of movement (Al-Natour, 1997). Most resort to seasonal jobs, hard labour or attempt to circumvent legal restrictions, which often involves being underpaid, overworked and unprotected (Hanafi and Long 2010). By and Lebanon’s naturalised Palestinians95 large, Lebanon has opposed the tawtin of its Palestinian population. This has been blamed on the country’s sensitive religio-demographic balance, which cannot sustain the

in The politics of identity