Ideology and the Gothic in Hagars Daughter
Eugenia DeLamotte

Delamotte examines the representation of race in Pauline Hopkins‘s Hagar‘s Daughter (1901/2). She argues that the novel provides a revision of the Female Gothic and also exploits narrative devices familiar from detective fiction. The solving of the ‘mystery’ that lies at the heart of the novel is one which explodes the ideological ‘mystery’, and the national crime of slavery, which separates Black and White, masculine and feminine, home and state, and African American and Euro-American families.

Gothic Studies
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The self-destroying Gothic villain in Pauline Hopkins’ Of One Blood
Bridget M. Marshall

This chapter explores how the villains in classic Gothic novels by Ann Radcliffe and Charles Brockden Brown used suicide to evade justice, and how this ‘suicide solution’ is later reworked by Pauline Hopkins in her 1903 Gothic novel Of One Blood . While the suicides of Radcliffe’s and Brown’s villains demonstrate their disregard for justice and judicial processes, Hopkins radically revises the possibility of justice through suicide. In these examples, suicidal Gothic villains present the reader with a complex moral quandary about how to

in Suicide and the Gothic

Suicide and the Gothic is the first protracted study of how the act of self-destruction recurs and functions within one of the most enduring and popular forms of fiction. Comprising eleven original essays and an authoritative introduction, this collection explores how the act of suicide has been portrayed, interrogated and pathologised from the eighteenth century to the present. The featured fictions include both the enduringly canonical and the less studied, and the geographical compass of the work embraces not merely British, European and American authors but also the highly pertinent issue of self-destruction in modern Japanese culture. Featuring detailed interventions into the understanding of texts as temporally distant as Thomas Percy’s Reliques and Patricia Highsmith’s crime fictions, and movements as diverse as Wertherism, Romanticism and fin-de-siècle decadence, Suicide and the Gothic provides a comprehensive and compelling overview of this recurrent crisis – a crisis that has personal, familial, religious, legal and medical implications – in fiction and culture. Suicide and the Gothic will prove a central – and provocative – resource for those engaged in the study of the genre from the eighteenth century onwards, but will also support scholars working in complementary literary fields from Romanticism to crime fiction and theoretical disciplines from the medical humanities to Queer Studies, as well as the broader fields of American and European studies. Its contents are as relevant to the undergraduate reader as they are to the advanced postgraduate and the faculty member: suicide is a crucial subject in culture as well as criticism.

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The most Gothic of acts – suicide in generic context
William Hughes and Andrew Smith

debates on the subject, including suicide’s seemingly contagious potential. Bridget M. Marshall, in ‘Suicide as justice? The self-destroying Gothic villain in Pauline Hopkins’ Of One Blood ’, begins by exploring how Ann Radcliffe and Charles Brockden Brown represent suicide as a way of achieving justice. Suicides by villains prevent the justice system (its processes and its outcomes) from further harming victims; they enable the legal system to have executions without executioners. Radcliffe and Brown’s suicide solution for their Gothic

in Suicide and the Gothic
Passing, racial identity and the literary marketplace
Sinéad Moynihan

fruitfully be read and appreciated with reference to their historical context. Interestingly, the ‘tragic mulatta’ played a key role in such disputes. In his introduction to Workings of the Spirit, for example, Houston A. Baker delineates what he terms Black Power (theoretical) versus Black Studies (historical) approaches to African American women’s writing and implicitly creates a three-way analogy between turn-of-the-twentieth-century writers (such as Pauline Hopkins), their mulatta protagonists and non-theorising African American women scholars, all of whom Baker

in Passing into the present
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Shifting racial and gender identities in Caucasia and Middlesex
Sinéad Moynihan

same father), Lydia Maria Child’s A Romance of the Republic (1868), Pauline Hopkins’s Hagar’s Daughter (1901–2) and Of One Blood (1902–3), William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! (1936) and Willa Cather’s Sapphira and the Slave Girl (1940). See also Sollors’s Neither Black Nor White for a discussion of the intersection of incest and miscegenation, pp. 285–335. 32 See, for example, Fauset’s Plum Bun (pp. 158–9) and Langston Hughes’s ‘Passing’, in The Ways of White Folks (1933; London: Vintage, 1990), pp. 51–5 (p. 51

in Passing into the present
Orphans learn and remember in African American novels
Maria Holmgren Troy, Elizabeth Kella and Helena Wahlström

imagine alternative societies and launch a comprehensive social and political critique (2012: 113): ‘Authors like Sutton E. Griggs, E. Pauline Hopkins, Charles W. Chestnutt, and Edward A. Johnson wrote works of speculative fiction in order to seize the literary and cultural power to articulate a restructuring of the very nation that was discriminating against them’ (ibid.: 114). 15 Butler has called her vampire novel a ‘science fantasy’ (2004: 218) since her protagonist is a genetic experiment combining the genes of two separate species, while Gomez sees her vampire

in Making home