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Heike Wieters

Colombian experiments The Peace Corps is not just a job. There are no 9:00 to 5:00 days in our operation. There will be little tolerance of a “tomorrow” philosophy and acceptance of an “it can’t be done because it hasn’t been done before” attitude. 1 Sargent Shriver, Peace

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
‘Showered with kindness?’
Author: Heike Wieters

This book provides a historical account of the NGO Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe (CARE) as one of the largest humanitarian NGOs worldwide from 1945 to 1980. Readers interested in international relations and humanitarian hunger prevention are provided with fascinating insights into the economic and business related aspects of Western non-governmental politics, fundraising and philanthropic giving in this field. The book also offers rich empirical material on the political implications of private and governmental international aid in a world marked by the order of the Cold War, and decolonialization processes. It elaborates the struggle of so called "Third World Countries" to catch up with modern Western consumer societies. In order to do justice to CARE's growing dimensions and to try to make sense of the various challenges arising from international operations, the book contains five main chapters on CARE's organizational development, with three case studies. It tells CARE's story on two different yet connected levels. First, it tells the story as a history of individuals and their interactions, conflicts, initiatives, and alliances within CARE and second as an organizational history focusing on institutional networks, CARE's role in international diplomacy. By the start of the 1960s CARE's strategically planned transformation into a development-oriented agency was in full swing. With United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Food for Peace, and the Peace Corps, several new government agencies in the development assistance sector were founded that offered potential junctions and opportunities for cooperation for CARE and the voluntary agencies in general.

The United States Peace Corps in the early 1960s
Agnieszka Sobocinska

The United States Peace Corps captured the public’s imagination in a way that few international development initiatives ever did. Presidential candidate John F. Kennedy first uttered the words ‘Peace Corps’ in early November 1960; two months later, a Gallup poll found that 89 per cent of Americans had heard of the Peace Corps, with 71 per cent in favour. 1 Over the following years, the Peace

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Heike Wieters

Agency for International Development (USAID) – in late 1961, the establishment of the Peace Corps as a civic development agency, the establishment of the Food for Peace Office, and finally the declaration of an Alliance for Progress with Latin America created a complex institutional setting that transformed foreign aid into a major US foreign policy tool in a bipolar world. 9 Technical assistance

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Heike Wieters

their visibility as private players in food aid, relief, and development assistance, despite growing competition from USAID experts and agencies such as the Peace Corps. Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society program, his focus on domestic and international poverty prevention, and the establishment of a War on Hunger office within USAID had also included the voluntary agencies as important proponents of

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80

This collection interrogates the representation of humanitarian crisis and catastrophe, and the refraction of humanitarian intervention and action, from the mid-twentieth century to the present, across a diverse range of media forms: traditional and contemporary screen media (film, television and online video) as well as newspapers, memoirs, music festivals and social media platforms (such as Facebook, YouTube and Flickr). The book thus explores the historical, cultural and political contexts that have shaped the mediation of humanitarian relationships since the middle of the twentieth century. Together, the chapters illustrate the continuities and connections, as well as the differences, which have characterised the mediatisation of both states of emergency and acts of amelioration. The authors reveal and explore the significant synergies between the humanitarian enterprise, the endeavour to alleviate the suffering of particular groups, and media representations, and their modes of addressing and appealing to specific publics. The chapters consider the ways in which media texts, technologies and practices reflect and shape the shifting moral, political, ethical, rhetorical, ideological and material dimensions of international humanitarian emergency and intervention, and have become integral to the changing relationships between organisations, institutions, governments, individual actors and entire sectors.

Sentiment and affect in mid-twentiethcentury development volunteering
Agnieszka Sobocinska

the United States Peace Corps. It examines the sentimental rhetoric of development volunteering agencies to demonstrate how they brought emotion and affect into the technical sphere of international development. It then tracks the diffusion of sentimental rhetoric to intending volunteers. Based on the examination of hundreds of application forms, the chapter argues that most volunteers were motivated by an idealistic desire

in Humanitarianism, empire and transnationalism, 1760–1995
Abstract only
Heike Wieters

initialized in overall US foreign assistance policy and its institutional context. With USAID, Food for Peace, and the Peace Corps, several new government agencies in the development assistance sector were founded that offered potential junctions and opportunities for cooperation for CARE and the voluntary agencies in general. Both USAID and Food for Peace were important in terms of resource acquisition as

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Open Access (free)
Michael Lawrence and Rachel Tavernor

understanding of, and also active involvement in, various global humanitarian endeavours, organisations and institutions that developed during and in the decades following the Second World War: the United Nations Organisation, the Marshall Plan and the US Peace Corps. This section examines a range of media forms, including popular cinema and television shows and documentary films, and press coverage and public relations campaigns, in

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Grassroots exceptionalism in humanitarian memoir
Emily Bauman

: A Peace Corps Chronicle that helped promote participation in the US Peace Corps. 1 As the industry has become entrenched as a third player permanently integrated into global relations, humanitarian memoir has become a fast-growing genre. For both the relief and development industries memoir is admirably suited as an ambassador from the field to the larger public, oriented as it is to personal

in Global humanitarianism and media culture