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Learning the languages of peace
Stanley Hauerwas

9780719082542_C02.qxd 8/9/11 15:52 Page 49 2 Pentecost: learning the languages of peace Stanley Hauerwas Being particular about particularity In his justly celebrated book, The Dignity of Difference: How to Avoid the Clash of Civilizations, Jonathan Sacks, the Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of Britain and the Commonwealth, argues that the ‘greatest single antidote to violence is conversation, speaking our fears, listening to the fears of others and in that sharing of vulnerabilities discovering a genesis of hope’.1 Some assume, according to

in Religion and rights
John Anderson

The impact of global Pentecostalism on democratisation is almost as hotly debated as the influence of the Christian Right on the American polity, and in some analyses the two movements are seen as connected. Initial studies tended to assume that Pentecostals were politically conservative and quiescent, inclined to other-worldly values that simply accepted the political order in the countries where they lived and worshipped. Several writers pointed to the support that Pentecostal leaders offered to General Pinochet in Chile, or to the

in Christianity and democratisation
Open Access (free)
Dennis Ray Knight Jr.

If he is known for anything other than his writings, James Baldwin is best known for his work as a civil rights activist. What is often overlooked is Baldwin’s work toward uniting two under-represented and oppressed groups: African Americans and homosexuals. With his first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, Baldwin began a career of speaking about and for homosexuals and their relationship with the institutions of African-American communities. Through its focus on a sensitive, church-going teenager, Go Tell It on the Mountain dramatizes the strain imposed upon homosexual members of African-American communities within the Pentecostal Church through its religious beliefs.

James Baldwin Review
Robert Z. Birdwell

Go Tell It on the Mountain sheds light on James Baldwin’s response to his Pentecostal religious inheritance. Baldwin writes protagonist John Grimes’s experience of “salvation” as an act of his own break with his past and the inauguration of a new vocation as authorial witness of his times. This break is premised on the experience of kairos, a form of time that was derived from Baldwin’s experience of Pentecostalism. Through John Grimes’s experience, Baldwin represents a break with the past that begins with the kairotic moment and progresses through the beginnings of self-love and the possibility of freedom enabled by this love. This essay contributes a new perspective on discussions of Baldwin’s representation of time and his relationship to Christianity.

James Baldwin Review
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The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 2008
Editor: Wes Williams

This book addresses the relationship between human rights and religion. The original blurb for the Oxford Amnesty Lectures of 2008 invited speakers and audiences to ponder arguments for the God-given source of human rights. The book explains how biblical inspiration (both Old and New Testament) fuelled the anti-slavery protests and later the civil rights movement in the United States. It develops the particular relevance, for arguments over human rights within Islam, of the writings of the medieval philosopher Muhammad al-Ghazali who justified an openness towards constructive engagement with other traditions. The book shows where the philosophical worldviews that inform the religion of Islam and the rights discourse may be distant from each other. It illustrates the challenge of taking the real world of human practice seriously while avoiding simplistic arguments for pluralism or relativism. The book focuses on Simon Schama's evocation of the religious fervour which helped feed the long struggles for liberation among American slave communities. It discusses the understanding of human rights in the Roman Catholic tradition. The book also shows that the Christian experience of Pentecost and what it means to learn to speak as well as understand another's language, is a continuing resource God has given the church to sustain the ability to suffer as well as respond to those who suffer for the long haul. The book argues that moral progress consists in the universalisation of Western liberal democracy with its specific understanding of human rights.

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Mark Maguire and Fiona Murphy

3817 Integration, locality 2nd version:Layout 1 22/6/12 12:45 Page 64 3 Enchanting Ireland Our fields of experience have no more definite boundaries than have our fields of view. Both are fringed forever by a more that continuously develops, and that continuously supersedes them as life proceeds. (William James) The Jesus Walk It was still dark when Pastor Femi telephoned. Days earlier, the pastor invited us to accompany Pentecostal worshippers on a walk through the streets of Drogheda. He gave us precise directions to the church where we were expected to

in Integration in Ireland
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Rhodri Hayward

the country was realising the biblical promises given in the Acts of the Apostles and the Book of Joel: ‘I will pour out my spirit upon all flesh; and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall dream dreams, your young men shall see visions.’4 This twentieth-century Pentecost – the Welsh Revival of 1904–5 – was perhaps the last flourish of mass resistance to the triumph of the historicist perspective.5 For a brief moment, the new rules of historical and psychological discourse were rent asunder. Their core assumptions – the narrative exclusion

in Resisting history
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John Anderson

returned to look at the impact of a revitalised Protestantism as represented by the predominantly evangelical Christian Right in the USA and the rapidly expanding global Pentecostal movement. In both cases we pointed to ambiguities, as religious leaders sometimes promoted illiberal policy agendas, yet the very fact of participating in politics often forced them to engage in the sort of bargaining and compromise that are an essential feature of democracy. Simultaneously, their followers often gained considerable experience in negotiating, organising and leading, all

in Christianity and democratisation
Connal Parr

time continues to represent a powerful crucible through which to explore identity and intra-communal division, though it was a terrain first mined by Sydenham-born Stewart Parker, whose play Pentecost (1989) is arguably the most sophisticated framing of the era of Sunningdale. Concerned very intimately with ‘the state of Protestant political identity as it emerged from the 1974 UWC strike (O’Toole, 1995), Parker’s work was 159 THE LEGACIES OF SUNNINGDALE not afraid to confront the baser elements in his own background. Echoing old Northern Ireland Labour grandees

in Sunningdale, the Ulster Workers’ Council strike and the struggle for democracy in Northern Ireland
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Geraldine Cousin

characterised by stasis. The past does not simply inform the present. It holds it prisoner. In addition, while Stephen Daldry’s production of An Inspector Calls brought the Zeitgeist into sharp focus, fear in these pieces is more difficult to define. There is a similar sense of precariousness, but it remains largely amorphous – a ghostly visitation, not an urgent warning of the proximity of the abyss. The chapter is mainly given over to a discussion of six Irish plays: Stewart Parker’s Pentecost; The Weir and Shining City by Conor McPherson; The Mai, Portia Coughlan and By the

in Playing for time