Robert Z. Birdwell

Go Tell It on the Mountain sheds light on James Baldwin’s response to his Pentecostal religious inheritance. Baldwin writes protagonist John Grimes’s experience of “salvation” as an act of his own break with his past and the inauguration of a new vocation as authorial witness of his times. This break is premised on the experience of kairos, a form of time that was derived from Baldwin’s experience of Pentecostalism. Through John Grimes’s experience, Baldwin represents a break with the past that begins with the kairotic moment and progresses through the beginnings of self-love and the possibility of freedom enabled by this love. This essay contributes a new perspective on discussions of Baldwin’s representation of time and his relationship to Christianity.

James Baldwin Review
From pious subjects to critical participants
Author: John Anderson

This book examines the contribution of different Christian traditions to the waves of democratisation that have swept various parts of the world in recent decades, offering an historical overview of Christianity's engagement with the development of democracy, before focusing in detail on the period since the 1970s. Successive chapters deal with: the Roman Catholic conversion to democracy and the contribution of that church to democratisation; the Eastern Orthodox ‘hesitation’ about democracy; the alleged threat to American democracy posed by the politicisation of conservative Protestantism; and the likely impact on democratic development of the global expansion of Pentecostalism. The author draws out several common themes from the analysis of these case studies, the most important of which is the ‘liberal-democracy paradox’. This ensures that there will always be tensions between faiths which proclaim some notion of absolute truth and political order, and which are also rooted in the ideas of compromise, negotiation and bargaining.

John Anderson

The impact of global Pentecostalism on democratisation is almost as hotly debated as the influence of the Christian Right on the American polity, and in some analyses the two movements are seen as connected. Initial studies tended to assume that Pentecostals were politically conservative and quiescent, inclined to other-worldly values that simply accepted the political order in the countries where they lived and worshipped. Several writers pointed to the support that Pentecostal leaders offered to General Pinochet in Chile, or to the

in Christianity and democratisation
The everyday lives of African migrants
Authors: Mark Maguire and Fiona Murphy

During the past fifteen years, many thousands of people have passed through the Irish asylum system, especially migrants from Africa. Public debates in Ireland, in common with other EU Member States, have been framed by ‘integration’ discourse. However, not enough is known about lived experiences of integration, especially among former asylum seekers and their families. This book builds on several years of in-depth ethnographic research to provide a striking portrait of the integration experiences of African migrants in Dundalk, Drogheda and Dublin. The book draws on contemporary anthropological theory to explore labour integration, civic and political participation, religion, education and youth identity. The stories of several key research participants are threaded through the book. The book draws out the rich voices of African migrants who struggle in their everyday lives to overcome racism and exclusion and, yet, are producing new cultural formations and generating reasons for societal hope. Set against the backdrop of a severe economic crisis and the ever-present hand of neo-liberal policies, this book is about everyday struggles and new visions for the future.

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Mark Maguire and Fiona Murphy

– different ways of Being-in-the-world (Fischer 1999). This chapter represents an effort to make sense of events such as this Jesus Walk and the everyday lives of the participants. We are concerned to show what is at stake for those involved. In obvious ways, our opening vignette describes Pentecostal worshippers engaging in a religious ritual. Much, therefore, must be said about Pentecostalism before appreciating its local articulations, from its central tenets and practices to its rapid rise and spread across the globe. However, this religious event cannot be bracketed

in Integration in Ireland
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Gabriel Feltran

The conclusion argues that today Brazil’s urban peripheries have two dichotomous public façades: on the one hand, they are the cause of ‘urban violence’ that calls for more repression; on the other hand, they are the focus of the ‘national development’ project which would turn poor people into middle-class individuals. The idea of urban violence, as commonly perceived, has displaced the focus of the contemporary social question from ‘the worker’ to the ‘marginal people’. As a side effect, tensions between ‘crime’ and ‘state’ regimes have grown and their relationship has found a common basis in monetised markets. Money seems to mediate the relationship between forms of life which, from other perspectives – legal or moral – would be in radical alterity. Consumption emerges as a form of common life and mercantile expansion, above all, connecting legal and illegal markets and fostering urban violence that otherwise would have been under control, had those territories seen economic development. Religion, and especially Pentecostalism, emerges as a plausible source of mediation between the regimes.

in The entangled city
Fiona Murphy and Ulrike M. Vieten

). For many of the taxi drivers we met Pentecostalism offered a different space through which to interpret their encounters with racism within their everyday lives. As another driver, Michael explained: It is racism, FACT!! People can call it whatever they like, but it is pure racism when someone looks at you and say, ‘Oh it is a black driver’, and then goes behind you and finds a white driver … It is humiliating, degrading … Is it I am a subhuman being? But I refuse to accept this kind of theory that I am a

in Immigrants as outsiders in the two Irelands
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Mark Maguire and Fiona Murphy

count. There is little doubt among those who know her that some day she will hold an important office. And, when Benedicta does gain such an office it will not just mark her successful integration or Ireland’s successful integration of migrants, rather that Benedicta’s upward mobility and leadership skills are a part of what integration actually means – she, among others, is giving social and cultural content to that word in Ireland. Throughout the course of two years of sustained ethnographic research we constantly encountered the power of Pentecostalism in the lives

in Integration in Ireland
Abstract only
Mark Maguire and Fiona Murphy

into asylum centres and give hope to asylum seekers. African taxi drivers reached for their beliefs as a means to survive in a harsh industry. Pentecostal churches were important staging grounds for local political campaigns. Furthermore, Pentecostal beliefs structured the interactions between parents, children and teachers in Irish schools. Faith is important, then, in any discussion of African-Irish life after asylum. But, what is more, Pentecostalism is growing as a frame through which African immigrants 3817 Integration, locality 2nd version:Layout 1 Conclusion

in Integration in Ireland
Jonathan Benthall

. Theories in social science tend to expire sooner or later. Martin, however, is also the sociologist who brought to academic attention the phenomenon of transnational Pentecostalism, a form of ‘voluntarism’ that challenges territorial religion but has also helped to stimulate charismatic manifestations in most of the mainstream Churches. Here Martin has been at odds with those

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times