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Geographies of transnational solidarity

This book provides a critical investigation of what has been termed the ‘global justice movement’. Through a detailed study of a grassroots peasants' network in Asia (People's Global Action); an international trade union network (the International Federation of Chemical, Energy, Mining and General Workers); and the Social Forum process, it analyses some of the global justice movement's component parts, operational networks and their respective dynamics, strategies and practices. The authors argue that the emergence of new globally connected forms of collective action against neoliberal globalisation are indicative of a range of variously place-specific forms of political agency that coalesce across geographic space at particular times, in specific places and in a variety of ways. They also argue that, rather than being indicative of a coherent ‘movement’, such forms of political agency contain many political and geographical fissures and fault-lines, and are best conceived of as ‘global justice networks’: overlapping, interacting, competing and differentially placed and resourced networks that articulate demands for social, economic and environmental justice. Such networks, and the social movements that comprise them, characterise emergent forms of trans-national political agency. The authors argue that the role of key geographical concepts of space, place and scale are crucial to an understanding of the operational dynamics of such networks. Such an analysis challenges key current assumptions in the literature about the emergence of a global civil society.

Peasant solidarity as horizontal networking?
Paul Routledge and Andrew Cumbers

This chapter considers People's Global Action (Asia), a recently established, non-hierarchical global network of diverse Asian grassroots social movements and activists, committed to decentralisation and political initiatives outside the realm of formal state politics. Its main function is to oppose the destructive consequences of neoliberal policies and to develop concrete alternatives.

in Global justice networks
Paul Routledge and Andrew Cumbers

saw the formation of PeoplesGlobal Action (PGA, having been conceptualised at a Zapatista Encuentro), which put out a ‘call to action’ for the upcoming WTO meetings in Geneva. In May, the first ‘human chain to break the chains of debt’ of 70,000 people ringed the G8 meeting in Birmingham, England. This was the first global day of action during which simultaneous, diverse protests against the WTO were held in 30 countries on five continents. Later that month, 10,000 people protested the second WTO Ministerial in Geneva, held in the United Nations building

in Global justice networks
Anarchism as a unique example
Dana M. Williams

, although they do not always identify as anarchist (many identify with autonomism, which is highly compatible with anarchist philosophy). Some implicit anarchists possess some anarchist criteria, but not other criteria; others, like PeoplesGlobal Action, possess all three criteria, all while still eschewing an anarchist label (de Marcellus 2000; Wood 2005). Since the value-based consistency of someone’s actions is more important to anarchists than the labels they cling to, implicit anarchists are more compatible with explicit anarchists than improperly anarchists

in Black flags and social movements
Dana M. Williams

large geographic distances. The ease in coordinating protests also amplified activist voices and allowed for the wider dissemination of demands, as seen by the anti-capitalist protests organized by the decentralized PeoplesGlobal Action network. It is difficult to miss the uniquely anarchistic nature of the internet, which functions as a decentralized network of information channels, allowing easy voluntary association and the relatively inexpensive ability to provide mutual aid, such as in setting up websites, email accounts, and mailing listserves (Wall 2007

in Black flags and social movements
Dana M. Williams

example, the Direct Action Network (Graeber 2009; Polletta 2002) and PeoplesGlobal Action (Maiba 2005; Wood 2005), which are laden with anarchist values and have anarchistic organizational structures, played a pivotal role in planning cross-national “days of action” to challenge capitalism at international economic forums and meetings.4 The anarchist movements of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were almost indistinguishable from the labor movement (individualist tendencies in North America aside) – or the general swell of activity we associate with

in Black flags and social movements