Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 63 items for :

  • "Peter Hutchings" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
The British horror film
Editor: Johnny Walker
Author: Peter Hutchings

The introductory chapter is written to help position the reader regarding the academic climate that saw the first edition of Hammer and Beyond materialise, to consider some of the book’s omissions, and to assess the state of British horror in the years immediately leading up to, and following, its publication.

Abstract only
Peter Hutchings

. Notes 1 Peter Hutchings, ‘The histogram and the list: the director in British film criticism’, The Journal of Popular British Cinema , 4 (2001). 2 Isabel Cristina Pinedo, Recreational Terror: Women and the Pleasures of Horror Film Viewing (New York, State University of New York Press

in Terence Fisher
Exclusions and exchanges in the history of European horror
Peter Hutchings

Culture (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2013) , 7–8. 8 For a fuller discussion of this, see Peter Hutchings, ‘Resident Evil? The Limits of European Horror: Resident Evil versus Suspiria ’, in Patricia Allmer, Emily Brick and David Huxley (eds), European Nightmares: Horror Cinema in Europe since 1945 (London: Wallflower, 2012), 13–23 . 9 Tohill and Tombs, Immoral Tales , 5. 10

in Hammer and beyond
Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend and Hammer’s The Night Creatures
Peter Hutchings

For a discussion of this context, see Jancovich, Rational Fears . 9 David Pirie, A Heritage of Horror: The English Gothic Cinema 1946–1972 (London: Gordon Fraser, 1973) , 9. 10 Matheson, Bloodlines , 221. 11 Cited in Peter Hutchings, Terence Fisher (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001) , 5–6. 12 Jancovich, Rational Fears , 149

in Hammer and beyond
Abstract only
Peter Hutchings

Although this ‘privilege’ is not universally accepted and in fact has often been challenged, most notably by producers and screenwriters. 24 For more on this, see Peter Hutchings, ‘Authorship and British cinema – the case of Roy Ward Baker’, in Justine Ashby and Andrew Higson (ed.), British Cinema – Past and Present (London, Routledge

in Terence Fisher
Peter Hutchings

side’, Cinefantastique , 4:3 (1975), p. 10. 2 For more on this, see Peter Hutchings, “‘We’re the Martians now”: British SF invasion fantasies of the 1950s and 1960s’, in I. Q. Hunter (ed.), British Science Fiction Cinema (London, Routledge), 1999, pp. 33—47. 3

in Terence Fisher
Peter Hutchings

. 6 For a fuller discussion of the press response to Hammer, see Peter Hutchings, Hammer and Beyond: The British Horror Film (Manchester, Manchester University Press), 1993, pp. 4–11. 7 David Pirie, A Heritage of Horror: The English Gothic Cinema 1946–1972 (London, Gordon Fraser), 1973, p. 50

in Terence Fisher
Abstract only
Author: Peter Hutchings

This book is about the British film director Terence Fisher. It begins by setting the context by detailing Fisher's directorial debut to Hammer's horror production and the importance of the Hammer horror to Fisher's career. Hammer's horror production represents one of the striking developments in post-war British cinema. The book explains some professional and industrial contexts in which Fisher operated and shows how these relate both to the films he made and the way in which these films have been judged and valued. It presents a detailed account of The Astonished Heart, Fisher's sixth film as director, highlighting the benefits and some of the problems involved in thinking about Fisher's career generally in its pre-horror phase. The successful Hammer film, The Curse of Frankenstein, both inaugurated the British horror boom and established Fisher as a film-maker whose name was known to critics as someone who specialised in the despised horror genre. After The Curse of Frankenstein, Fisher became primarily a horror director. The book presents an account of the highs and lows Fisher faced in his directorial career, highlighting his significant achievements and his box-office failures. It also shows Fisher as a director dependent on and at ease with the industrial and collaborative nature of film-making. In a fundamental sense, what value there is in Terence Fisher's work exists because of the British film industry and the opportunities it afforded Fisher, not despite the industry.

Abstract only
Peter Hutchings

This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in this book. The book is about the British film director Terence Fisher. It demonstrates that an appreciation of Fisher's films is aided by thinking about them in terms of that British accent. Ultimately, perhaps, this provides the best way of trying to understand what it is about Fisher's films that makes them so distinctive. It takes us closer to explaining why some of these films have captured the imagination of so many for so long. A way of establishing Fisher's work as significantly British is through locating it in relation to an indigenous gothic tradition. A revealing exchange of views about 'Britishness' and one especially pertinent to an understanding of Fisher's work occurred during the pre-production of The Curse of Frankenstein, Fisher's first horror film.

in Terence Fisher
Peter Hutchings

In thematic terms, a sense of desire as a dangerously uncontrollable force can be seen to inform Terence Fisher's later films. In the horror work, the powerful and effective heroes tend to be celibate while those individuals who succumb to desire usually end badly. In the pre-horror work discussed in this chapter, one gains a sense that Fisher is more engaged in those scenarios which afford him the possibility of exploring or commenting upon the perils of desire. Possible traces of Fisher's input are minimal, as one might expect from a project in which Noel Coward was so obviously the leading light. Most of the films he directed at Highbury and Gainsborough were thoroughly conventional, both generically and in broader aesthetic terms, and rarely went beyond the norms and types that characterise British cinema at this time.

in Terence Fisher