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Migrants’ anchoring in an age of insecurity

This monograph argues that well-established concepts in migration studies such as ‘settlement’ and ‘integration’ do not sufficiently capture the features of adaptation and settling of contemporary migrants. Instead, it proposes the integrative and transdisciplinary concept of anchoring, linking the notions of identity, adaptation and settling while overcoming the limitations of the established concepts and underlining migrants’ efforts at recovering their feelings of security and stability. Drawing on 80 in-depth interviews with Polish migrants in the UK and Ukrainian migrants in Poland, ethnographic and autobiographical research together with an analysis of Internet blogs and forums, the book presents the author’s original concept of anchoring, underpinned by a combination of sociological and psychological perspectives, as well as demonstrating its applications. The book aims not only to provide a theoretical and methodological contribution to better understanding and examining the processes of adaptation and settling among today’s migrants, but also to highlight practical implications useful for the better support of individuals facing changes and challenges in new, complex and fluid societies.

Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

As mentioned in the introduction, the empirical analyses presented in this book are based on the material gathered in my research conducted in 2014–2015 within the Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship SAST. In total, 80 individual in-depth interviews and questionnaires were undertaken with 40 post-accession Polish migrants in the UK and 40 post-2004 Ukrainian migrants to Poland legally residing there (see the Appendix, Tables 1 and 2 ). The participants needed to meet a selection criterion of not having a local spouse or life partner, to

in Rethinking settlement and integration
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

This chapter aims to synthesise crucial points about anchoring which emerge from my research with Ukrainian migrants in Poland and Polish migrants in the UK, to develop a framework that allows for a better understanding of the processes of migrant adaptation and settling. In order to outline key elements useful for building a general model of migrants’ anchoring, it concentrates on commonalities observed across both groups, in contrast to the previous chapters, which focused on Ukrainian migrants in Poland and Polish migrants in the UK as

in Rethinking settlement and integration
Abstract only
Polish migrants in the UK
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

This chapter analyses the mechanisms of adaptation and settling among Polish migrants in the UK, where less circular migration was observed than in the case of Ukrainian migrants in Poland. Even though settlement processes remained more noticeable among the Poles than among the Ukrainians, they can still be better characterised in terms of anchoring rather than putting down roots. This may be linked, on the one hand, to a larger cultural and geographical distance between Poles and British society, and on the other hand to the situation at the

in Rethinking settlement and integration
Abstract only
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

migration studies such as ‘integration’ and ‘settlement’ are not sufficient to understand and examine the ways of accommodation, functioning and experience of contemporary migrants. I argue that my concept of anchoring, developed through research with Polish migrants in the UK and Ukrainian migrants in Poland, might provide a more integrative and comprehensive transdisciplinary approach to analysing the processes of migrants’ adaptation and settling. It does this by linking the existing notions while overcoming their limitations, as well as by underlining the

in Rethinking settlement and integration
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

one's own group is hostile and unwilling to enter a relationship. Galasinski and Galasinska ( 2007 ) analysed the case study of an unemployed Polish migrant in the UK who felt un-anchored in the surrounding external world, unable to recognise his agency, which was interpreted by the researchers as a defence mechanism to deny responsibility for possible failures. These authors concluded that failure in external anchoring results in a sense of disconnection, loneliness and lack of control. As demonstrated earlier, being too strongly anchored in

in Rethinking settlement and integration
Abstract only
From theory to practical applications?
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

This monograph demonstrates the centrality of safety and stability in the narratives of Polish migrants in the UK and Ukrainian migrants in Poland. The presence of the references to security and stability, as well as the spontaneous usage of metaphors related to anchoring, support the relevance of the proposed concept and significance of safety and stability when seeking to understand migrants’ adaptation and settling. The concept of anchoring – understood as establishing and managing footholds which migrants use to recover

in Rethinking settlement and integration
Bryan Fanning

’, Research Report for the RES-00–1294 ESRC Project (Surrey: CRONEM, University of Surrey, 2007), p. 21. 28 D. McGhee, C. Moreh and A. Vlachantoni, ‘An undeliberate determinancy? The changing migration strategies of Polish migrants in the UK in times of Brexit’, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies , 43:13 (2017), 2019–2130. 29 Ibid., p. 2118. 30 Ibid., p. 2121. 31 Ibid., p. 2121. 32 Ibid., p. 2121. 33 The Growing

in Immigrants as outsiders in the two Irelands
Marta Kempny

Migracyjne – Prezeglad Polonijy Rok , XXXVII Z.1:139 (2011), 129 – 152, p. 136. 21 P. Trevena, D. McGhee and S. Heath, ‘Location, location? A critical examination of patterns and determinants of internal mobility among post‐accession Polish migrants in the UK’, Population, Space and Place , 19: 6 (2013), 671–687. 22 N. Gill, ‘Pathologies of migrant place-making: the case of Polish migrants to the UK’, Environment and Planning A , 42:5 (2010), 1157–1173. 23 S. Pemberton and J. Phillimore

in Immigrants as outsiders in the two Irelands
French community rejection and projection
Saskia Huc-Hepher

treatment in the UK’ (Moreh et al ., 2018: 4). Having had a negative experience in the NHS, Miranda has turned to private surgical treatment in London, and Séverine is semi-critical of the NHS, denouncing the anonymity of the doctor–patient relationship and GP appointment waiting times, also noted by Polish migrants in the UK (Horsfall, 2019 ). It is useful to consider that Charles has been a London resident for eleven years, Miranda for ten and Séverine for twenty-six. As Moreh et al . posit, ‘[m]igrants who are more integrated into British society are significantly

in French London