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Understanding Britain’s extreme right
Author: Paul Jackson

"Pride in Prejudice offers a concise introduction to the varied extreme right groups active in Britain. It looks to the past, in order to explore the roots of this complex movement, while focusing on the numerous groups and activists that make up Britain’s contemporary extreme right. This timely analysis examines the extreme right movement in terms of ideology and appeal, organisational styles, online and offline activism, approaches to leadership, types of supporters and gendered dynamics. Jackson also evaluates successes and failures in policy responses to the extreme right, and identifies the on-going risks posed by lone-actor terrorism.

Showcasing the latest research, Pride in Prejudice argues that Britain has never been immune from the extreme right, and demonstrates the movement has a long history in the country. It is made up of a wide variety of organisations, helping give this marginalised culture a diverse appeal and many are attracted for emotive as well as more rational reasons. While risks posed by the extreme right are manageable, Jackson concludes that this is only possible if we make ourselves aware of the ways the movement operates, and that by doing so we can also make multicultural liberal democracy more robust.

Paul Jackson

-community initiatives rather than policies that focused on one sector of society alone. Funding for Prevent was initially based on the size of Muslim populations, 10 and much of the focus has been around threats deemed to be posed by Islam. More recent news reports on the increased focus on the extreme right has partly helped to shift perceptions, but this has been limited. So, while most who have delivered the Prevent

in Pride in prejudice
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Resisting racism in times of national security
Editor: Asim Qureshi

In times of national security, scholars and activists who hail from the communities under suspicion attempt to draw readers and listeners to the complexity of the world we inhabit. For those who campaigned against the SUS law in the 1980s, when young Black men were being routinely stopped in the streets, the wave of counter-terrorism legislation and policy that exists today will be very familiar. Similarly, recent discussions about the impact of drill music in the culture of young Black men has drawn questions around the ways in which they should be securitised, with senior police calling for the use of terrorism legislation against them. In this environment, when those who study and have lived alongside the communities who are at the scrutiny of the state raise questions about the government, military and police policy, they are often shut down as terrorist-sympathisers, or apologists for gang culture. In such environments, there is an expectation on scholars and activists to condemn what society at large fears. This volume is about how that expectation has emerged alongside the normalisation of racism, and how these writers choose to subvert the expectations raised on them, as part of their commitment to anti-racism.

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Paul Jackson

politicians who have at times borrowed from the extreme right’s messaging. In the past, policies around restricting immigration in the twentieth century, and more recently the Prevent Agenda, have helped reinforce negative views towards specific communities that are not white, though Prevent, despite its problems, has also done much important work helping veer people away from extreme right violence. The

in Pride in prejudice
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Vicki Squire, Nina Perkowski, Dallal Stevens, and Nick Vaughan-Williams

and racism. Nevertheless, what also emerges from the analysis are two more far-reaching sets of demands that provide a direct contestation of the preventative agenda and the politics of crisis: demands for justice that highlight the EU's complicity in war and conflict across the Middle East, and demands for justice that highlight the EU's ineffective aid policies in sub-Saharan Africa. In different ways, these two sets of demands suggest that the EU is involved in producing or perpetuating the situations that drive migration, as well as in creating conditions that

in Reclaiming migration
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Precarity, justice, postcoloniality
Vicki Squire, Nina Perkowski, Dallal Stevens, and Nick Vaughan-Williams

policy is a critical concern, because this serves to divest the preventative agenda from its wider politics while justifying its advancement in both securitising and humanitarian terms (see Chapter 1 ). Our contention is that it is critical to engage people migrating as having life histories and lived experiences that need to be understood, and as having claims or demands for justice that need to be taken into account; it is only then that we can begin to overturn trajectories of racialised violence in which we are all implicated. The claims of people on the move in

in Reclaiming migration
Saffa Mir

forever be the Other. Successive governments can scream at us to integrate into wider society, but until the wider society welcomes us as we are, these comments will always be said. Assimilation appears to be a self-fulfilling myth, always pointed out, but unachievable. Regardless of the above, this woman of the community was then elected into another position, this time as the vice-president of Student Affairs of FOSIS. It was in this role that I was able to witness the true extent to which the Prevent agenda was impacting Muslim students across campuses. Every day I

in I Refuse to Condemn
Community
Thomas Martin

understanding of problem environments, which are then acted upon by the Prevent assemblage. In doing so, the chapter details how British communities policy and the Prevent agenda come to be intimately bound together. The problematic identified in the past two chapters renders environments within which becoming takes place as a central concern. In this chapter, the book analyses these environments, exploring how certain communities and institutional spaces come to be seen as problematic, conducive to radicalisation. In analysing

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
Thomas Martin

( 2010 ; see also Thomas, 2009 , 2014 , 2017 ) usefully sums up the literature’s analysis of the relation between the targeted security strand of Prevent and its broader community cohesion initiatives; an analysis that materialises following the emergence of the full Prevent agenda in 2007 and continues until the alleged separation of community cohesion and Prevent in 2011. The four key problems of the policy are understood to be its monocultural focus on Muslims, its use as a vehicle for surveillance and intelligence

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
Open Access (free)
Monstrous markets – neo-liberalism, populism and the demise of the public university
John Holmwood and Jan Balon

the UK, Dame Louise Casey (2016), in a recent review into ‘Opportunity and Integration’, has called for migrants to ‘swear an oath of allegiance’ on arrival into the UK, while schools, under the Prevent agenda, are obliged to teach ‘British values’. Danielle Allen (2004) has made a similar argument to Müller’s about the problematic idea of popular sovereignty that is frequently represented as a republican ideal. For example, incorporated in the US Declaration of Independence and reproduced daily in US schools is the Pledge of Allegiance to ‘one Nation indivisible

in Science and the politics of openness