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Persistent preachers, 1807–1907
Author: Jennifer Lloyd

A response to the prominent Methodist historian David Hempton's call to analyse women's experience within Methodism, this book deals with British Methodist women preachers over the entire nineteenth century, with special emphasis on the Primitive Methodists and Bible Christians. The book covers women preachers in Wesley's lifetime, the reason why some Methodist sects allowed women to preach and others did not, and the experience of Bible Christian and Primitive Methodist female evangelists before 1850. It also describes the many other ways in which women supported their chapel communities. The second half of the book includes the careers of mid-century women revivalists, the opportunities, home and foreign missions offered for female evangelism, the emergence of deaconess evangelists and Sisters of the People in late century, and the brief revival of female itinerancy among the Bible Christians.

Jennifer Lloyd

later, after the 1803 Methodist Conference had placed severe restrictions on women preachers. The Primitive Methodist leader Hugh Bourne, whom Betsey met in 1809, believed that she had ‘lost some ground when entering the married state. She engaged in this on a cloudy day when under persecution.’5 In the next eighteen years the couple had two children, Samuel established and lost a weaving mill, and both spent much time as rural evangelists. Betsey never appeared officially on the Methodist preaching plan, but Samuel was disciplined several times for sending his wife

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Abstract only
Jennifer Lloyd

Introduction In 1862 Mary O’Bryan Thorne wrote in her diary: ‘At our East Street anniversary I spoke at 11, and Serena [her daughter] at 2:30 and 6; one was converted in the evening.’1 She regarded this as a routine engagement, something she had been doing for more than forty years and that her daughter had every right to continue. Thorne was the daughter of the founder of the Bible Christian Connexion and a Bible Christian local preacher. Women preached regularly in the Bible Christian (1815–1907) and the Primitive Methodist Connexions (1807–1934), both

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

daughters wrote, ‘She had very low views of her own attainments as a Christian as well as her acts of usefulness – fearing she had done nothing to advance the cause of Christ; but she found great consolation in the thought that in the atonement she and all her works might not be lost.’19 Mary O’Bryan’s experience was typical of the young women who felt the call to preach in the Bible Christian and Primitive Methodist Connexions in the 1820s and 1830s, when the excitement of outdoor preaching and public conversion was at its height in both sects and women were hired as

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

untimely death in 1903, when her father gave £250 toward building the Samuel Thorne Hospital in Chao Tong, China, in her memory.8 By mid-century there were many Mrs. Terretts, bridging the divide between public and private in ways that did not overtly challenge acceptable gender roles. In the 1840s and 1850s women in all religious denominations adapted the ways in which they expressed their beliefs to changing economic circumstances, social structures, and ideals of womanhood. Methodist women, even those Bible Christians and Primitive Methodists who were still working as

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

to Georgia and when he returned and began to preach outdoors, John Wesley intended to reach those who never came to formal religious services. The nineteenth-century evangelical offshoots also saw missionary work as central to their existence. A speaker at the 1862 Primitive Methodist missionary meeting claimed, ‘We look on the whole Connexion as one great and grand missionary organization,’ and the Bible Christian Thomas Ruddle, head of the Connex-   210   LLoyd_03_chap 5-8.indd 210 17/09/2009 10:05 women in missions at home and abroad ional school, wrote

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

7 Deaconesses, Sisters of the People, and the revival of female itinerancy E mma Davis, the woman who became widely known in the central London district of Blackfriars as ‘Sister Annie,’ was born in Aldersgate in 1859, the eldest child of a poor family. Her mother died when she was eight, and the family moved to the dock area of Rotherhithe, where she attended a Primitive Methodist Sunday school. At age thirteen she abandoned formal schooling to work as a domestic servant, but left when her employer would not let her go to Sunday school. She took a job as a

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

continuous preaching, eager crowds, and constant additions to the church.’2 In 1862 she was in Wales, attracting more than 1,000 people to a large Welsh chapel.3 However, family troubles intervened. Tensions were so high between her father and her brothers Ebenezer and William, who worked together in the printing business, that in 1863 she agreed to emigrate with them to Queensland, Australia, together with her older sister Susannah. In Queensland Serena began working as an evangelist for the Primitive Methodists. She was so popular that when she fell gravely ill with

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
The religious politics of burial
Julie Rugg

, where the numeric and economic strength of Methodism had led to the building and rebuilding of hundreds of Wesleyan and Primitive Methodist chapels, the opportunities presented by the Act would have been understood and exploited. In a 1981 study of 173 3981 Churchyard and cemetery:Layout 1 3/7/13 08:47 Page 174 The churchyard in the cemetery Methodism, Nigel Scotland indicated that rural Methodists ‘had learned to wrestle with the clergyman and his farmerdominated vestry over the control of education, the churchyard and the distribution of village charities’.3

in Churchyard and cemetery
The Pan-African Conference of 1900
Jonathan Schneer

.’ 24 Hoping to reach a broader audience, he chose a new platform, the Missionary Committee of the Primitive Methodist Church. Like the Good Templars, a church boasting universalist aspirations proved to be more open than a trade union or socialist society to the young African-Caribbean. Edwards hoped the Methodists would send him to Africa. They sent him to London. His writings and lectures grew overtly political, condemning the hypocrisy and greed of European imperialists who claimed to be spreading civilisation and

in Imperial cities