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Politics, Pageantry and Colonialism

Royal tours of the 1800s and early 1900s, and since, have created much documentation, perhaps the most obvious record contained in newspapers and magazines, newsreels and then radio and television broadcasts. Tours expressed and promoted royal and imperial authority, though in some instances they revealed resistance against expansionist designs. The royal visitor was the central actor in a tour, but was surrounded by an entourage of other people and a store of paraphernalia that played essential roles. This book examines how presentation is managed when ambassadors are sent in place of the royal personage. Sultan Alauddin of Aceh mounted a royal tour by proxy in which he was embodied - and concealed - in his gifts and in the humbler persons of his placeholders. Prince Alfred Ernest Albert, Duke of Edinburgh, provided a template for later royal tours in three ways. First, he pioneered a new relationship with the Royal Navy as a training institution for British princes. Second, his lengthy visits paved the way for similarly ambitious global tours. Alfred's tours cultivated a range of trusted support staff. Imperial citizenship and even Britishness were embraced by non- English and non- British subjects of the queen. One young prince who was present in Britain at some of the most glittering events was Thakur Sahib Bhagvatsinh, a Rajput who ruled Gondal. The book also discusses Kaiser Wilhelm II's tour, King Sisowath and Emperor Khai Dinh's tour to France, the Portuguese crown prince's tour of Africa, and tours during Smuts's Raj.

Prince Alfred’s precedent in overseas British royal tours, c. 1860– 1925

parts of the British empire and wider world, and this chapter argues that his 1860s and 1870s journeys provided an important precedent for the more famous British princely tours that followed. Like the old grammar school, Alfred’s precedent is a historical subject ‘within sight, and now vacated’. As in 1881, a tour guide is needed. Prince Alfred Ernest Albert, Duke of Edinburgh (1844–1900) remains a surprisingly shadowy

in Royals on tour
African encounters with Prince Alfred on his royal tour, 1860

Plunkett, Queen Victoria , p. 241. 12 Aronson, Royal Ambassadors . 13 Progress of H.R.H. Prince Alfred Ernest Albert, Through the Cape Colony, British Kaffraria, the Orange Free State and Port Natal in

in Mistress of everything
Open Access (free)
Global Britishness and settler cultures in South Africa and New Zealand

Africa and a hub for all communication and commerce on the subcontinent. One leading Cape ‘liberal’ was Saul Solomon, who published the Cape Argus. His narrative of the royal visit, The Progress of His Royal Highness Prince Alfred Ernest Albert through the Cape Colony, British Kaffraria, the Orange Free State, and Port Natal, in the Year 1860 , framed the tour’s importance in the

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911

–7. 64 Saul Solomon, The Progress of His Royal Highness Prince Alfred Ernest Albert through the Cape Colony, British Kaffraria, the Orange Free State, and Port Natal in the Year 1860 (Cape Town, 1861), 86–92. 65 Alfred to Queen Victoria, 24 January 1870, RA VIC/ADD/A/20

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911

. 27 Saul Solomon, The Progress of His Royal Highness Prince Alfred Ernest Albert through the Cape Colony, British Kaffraria, the Orange Free State, and Port Natal in the Year 1860 (Cape Town, 1861), 75. 28 Solomon, The Progress of His Royal Highness , 76; Natal Mercury , 11 October

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
A gendered divide in Victorian society

and G. Scanlan, M.D. (London: John Murray, 1875), pp. viii, 180–​2, 194–​7. Anon. [Professor Roderick Noble], The Progress of His Royal Highness, Prince Alfred Ernest Albert through the Cape Colony, British Kaffraria, the Orange Free State, and Port Natal, in the Year 1860 (Cape Town: Saul Solomon, 1861), pp. 85–​90. 5 Bisset, Sport and War, pp. 218–​21, 235–​53. 6 Prince Albert’s battues in the Scottish Highlands in the 1840s were satirised in Punch cartoons. Diana Donald, Picturing Animals in Britain, 1750–​1850 (New Haven and London:  Yale University Press, 2007

in Women against cruelty