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James Doelman

In November 1612 when Prince Henry, heir to the English and Scottish thrones, died at the age of eighteen, the diplomat Isaac Wake described the public grief: ‘I must confess never to have seen such a sight of mortification in my life, nor never so just a sorrowe so well expressed as in all y e spectators, whose streaming eyes made knowen howe much inwardly their harts

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy

This book presents a biography of the poetics and politics of London in 1613, from Whitehall to Guildhall, that is, Shakespeare's London. It examines major events at court, such as the untimely death of Prince Henry and its aftermath, and the extravagant wedding of Princess Elizabeth to Frederick of Germany and her journey to the Continent. The city flourished with scores of publications on a vast array of topics, including poetry, travel narratives, music, and, of course, plays. The book offers summaries and analyses of most of these texts, knowing that some of them may not be well-known to all readers. Many of these publications had a kind of link to the court. In order to understand the context of the year 1613, the book actually begins in October 1612 with Prince Henry's illness and death in November, which had a major impact on what happened in 1613. It proceeds more or less chronologically from this event to Princess Elizabeth's wedding and the stunning array of dramatic performances at court, and includes the journey to her new home in Germany. As part of the year's cultural nexus, the narrative reaches into the Guildhall experience to explore the riches of the books that emanated from London's printers and to examine specifically the drama performed or published in 1613. The final major focus centres on the Carr-Howard wedding at the year's end, full of cultural activities and ripe with political significance.

David M. Bergeron

allowed his mind to stray to those streets of memory that led to death’s marketplace. With a pain still raw, Lennox thought of Prince Henry’s death of just a few months earlier. The ferocious wind outside that lashed at his chambers in this the harshest winter of recent times coincided with sober and sombre reflections. Lennox’s mind wandered back as it had many times to October 1612

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
Shakespeare and King James
Neil Rhodes

the case of James the very word ‘sentence’ has to be understood not just as a linguistic unit, but as an expression of real and effective J power. So what I want to do in the remainder of this chapter is to address the issue of Shakespeare and Scotland through the writing of James himself and, in particular, through his manual of kingship, Basilicon Doron , his ‘royal gift’ to Prince Henry, and the

in Shakespeare and Scotland
Tristan Marshall

Chapter 3 1611–13 ‘The true Panthæon of Great Britaine’ Voicy L’Alexandre de la grande Bretaigne ... Le voicy les armes à la main, face et pointe tournées ver L’ennemy de Dieu ...1 T he role played by James’s eldest son, Prince Henry, in the inculcation of an imperial mentality was critical. The period from 1611 to 1613 saw the apotheoses of theatrical material relating to the new Britain, coinciding as it did with Henry’s investiture as Prince of Wales and the marriage of the Princess Elizabeth to the Elector Palatine. These years also witnessed the accretion

in Theatre and empire
Tristan Marshall

Chapter 4 1614–25 Brute, force and ignorance? victory obtayned by the joint valour of English and Scots will more indelibly Christen your Majesties Empire greate Brittaine, then any act of Parliament or artifice of State. Anon., Tom Tell Troath I n the period following the death of Prince Henry in 1612 and the departure of Frederick and Elizabeth in 1613 there was a palpable sense of hiatus for those advocating a strong British Protestantism. With no great figureheads around whom to rally it is tempting to surmise that, until the return of Charles and

in Theatre and empire
Confessional conflict and the origins of English Protestantism in Samuel Rowley’s When You See Me You Know Me (1605)
Brian Walsh

indebtedness to Foxe and a common strain of anti-​Catholicism, is reductive.7 Each in its own way demonstrates Annabel Patterson’s claim that the Reformation, because of the ‘divisive forces [it] unleashed’, made impossible the production of a unifying or monologic historiography of the years covering and following Henry’s reign.8 In this essay, I will concentrate on When You See Me You Know Me (c. 1605). Written by Samuel Rowley and performed by Prince Henry’s Men, perhaps at court as well as on the popular stage, this play delves deeper than the others into the

in Forms of faith
Drama’s solace
David M. Bergeron

). James tried to stand resolute against the desire for the wedding to proceed. Foscarini reports to Venice on 11 January 1613: ‘his Majesty stood firm, declaring that mourning should be mourning, and marriage rejoicings rejoicings’ (474). While discussions continued about setting the precise date for the wedding, King James also pursued another kind of marital negotiation. At the time of Prince Henry’s

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
Abstract only
David M. Bergeron

The path away from the court’s dramatic entertainment pointed toward the much-anticipated wedding, the occasion of a new beginning, full of excitement and joy. Even the weather brightened. Lennox took delight in all the festivities, including the installation of Prince Frederick into the Order of the Garter, the group in which Lennox himself, along with Prince Henry, had

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
Abstract only
The material and visual culture of the Stuart Courts, 1589–1619
Author: Jemma Field

This book analyses Anna of Denmark’s material and visual patronage at the Stuart courts, examining her engagement with a wide array of expressive media including architecture, garden design, painting, music, dress, and jewellery. Encompassing Anna’s time in Denmark, England, and Scotland, it establishes patterns of interest and influence in her agency, while furthering our knowledge of Baltic-British transfer in the early modern period. Substantial archival work has facilitated a formative re-conceptualisation of James and Anna’s relationship, extended our knowledge of the constituents of consortship in the period, and has uncovered evidence to challenge the view that Anna followed the cultural accomplishments of her son, Prince Henry. This book reclaims Anna of Denmark as the influential and culturally active royal woman that her contemporaries knew. Combining politics, culture, and religion across the courts of Denmark, Scotland, and England, it enriches our understanding of royal women’s roles in early modern patriarchal societies and their impact on the development of cultural modes and fashions. This book will be of interest to upper level undergraduate and postgraduate students taking courses on early modern Europe in the disciplines of Art and Architectural History, English Literature, Theatre Studies, History, and Gender Studies. It will also attract a wide range of academics working on early modern material and visual culture, and female patronage, while members of the public who enjoy the history of courts and the British royals will also find it distinctively appealing.