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American horror comics as Cold War commentary and critique

Printing Terror places horror comics of the mid-twentieth century in dialogue with the anxieties of their age. It rejects the narrative of horror comics as inherently and necessarily subversive and explores, instead, the ways in which these texts manifest white male fears over America’s changing sociological landscape. It examines two eras: the pre-CCA period of the 1940s and 1950s, and the post-CCA era to 1975. The authors examine each of these periods through the lenses of war, gender, and race, demonstrating that horror comics are centred upon white male victimhood and the monstrosity of the gendered and/or racialised other. It is of interest to scholars of horror, comics studies, and American history. It is suitably accessible to be used in undergraduate classes.

Jessica Coatesworth

The first 100 years of printing in Europe was a vibrant period full of innovation and adaptation. Continental printers controlled the production of Latin books, many of which were imported into England. English printers worked hard to create an audience for their editions and achieved,this by adopting specific design features from the Latin editions. Yet despite this connection, English printing is often studied in separation from European printing. This article studies the Golden Legend, a hagiographic text popular throughout England and Europe, and shows that the two traditions were interrelated, especially in book design. On the continent, printers found themselves in a crowded marketplace and some adopted established designs to target a particular audience. In contrast, English printers were inspired by the design of continental books. Design was governed by the intended audience but not restricted to national demarcations. Not only was English printing integrated with European printing, it sustained a distinctive character while remaining part of the European tradition.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
The mechanisation of memory
Frieder Nake

itself to us as technology, is congealed, preserved, dead labour, 1 labour in a zombified state. 2 At the push of a button, it can be set in motion and stopped again. In between, it sometimes achieves tremendous effects. […] Our topic is the image. What is more, our topic is the memory that can be taken on by a printing plate, a piece of material

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
In search of Manly Banister, an excerpt from an unpublishable memoir
R.L. Tillman

, and I have a preternatural tendency to strip screws. I'm not proud of it. But do I really need some hairy-armed ghost named ‘Manly Banister’ to remind me? In this regard, one Popular Mechanics article was of special concern: ‘Build A Table Top Printing Press.’ As a printer, I'm capable enough with the tools of my trade, and I know my way around a

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Ann Blair

In our time of increasing reliance on digital media the history of the book has a special role to play in studying the codex form and the persistence of old media alongside the growth of new ones. As a contribution to recent work on the continued use of manuscript in the handpress era, I focus on some examples of manuscripts copied from printed books in the Rylands Library and discuss the motivations for making them. Some of these manuscripts were luxury items signalling wealth and prestige, others were made for practical reasons – to own a copy of a book that was hard to buy, or a copy that could be customized in the process of copying. The act of copying itself was also considered to have devotional and/or pedagogical value.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library