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Open Access (free)
Batman Saves the Congo: How Celebrities Disrupt the Politics of Development
Alexandra Cosima Budabin
and
Lisa Ann Richey

studies of Batman’s celebrity strategic partnerships with Theo Chocolate and Starbucks use the brands’ core activities of sourcing ‘rare’ products for ‘ethical’ and ‘luxury’ retail and consumption. Closer to the fairtrade model, this approach embeds CSR into the companies’ supply chains, all the while seeking to integrate Congolese chocolate and coffee producers in global production networks and revive production and trade. In this way, CSR for development or humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Aspirations, experiences and trajectories

Africans have long graced football fields around the world. The success of icons such as Samuel Eto’o, Didier Drogba and Mohamed Salah has fuelled the migratory projects of countless male youth across the African continent who dream of following in their footsteps. Using over a decade of ethnographic research, African Football Migration captures the historical, geographical and regulatory features of this migratory process. The book uncovers and traces the myriad actors, networks and institutions that impact the ability of children and youth across the continent to realise social mobility through football’s global production network. This sheds critical light on how young people are trying to negotiate contemporary barriers to social becoming erected by neoliberal capitalism. It also generates original interdisciplinary perspectives on the complex interplay between structural forces and human agency as young players navigate an industry rife with commercial speculation. A select few are fortunate enough to reach the elite levels of the game and build a successful career overseas. Significantly, the book vividly illustrates how for the vast majority, the outcome of ‘trying their luck’ through football is involuntary immobility in post-colonial Africa. These findings are complemented by rare empirical insights from transnational African migrants at the margins of the global football industry and those navigating precarious post-playing-career lives. In unpacking these issues, African Football Migration offers fresh perspectives on the transnational strategies deployed by youth and young men striving to improve their life chances, and the role that mobility – imagined and enacted – plays in these struggles.

The dynamic processes of knowledge production in archaeology and elsewhere in the humanities and social sciences are increasingly viewed within the context of negotiation, cooperation and exchange, as the collaborative effort of groups, clusters and communities of scholars. Shifting focus from the individual scholar to the wider social contexts of her work, this volume investigates the importance of informal networks and conversation in the creation of knowledge about the past, and takes a closer look at the dynamic interaction and exchange that takes place between individuals, groups and clusters of scholars in the wider social settings of scientific work. Various aspects of and mechanisms at work behind the interaction and exchange that takes place between the individual scholar and her community, and the creative processes that such encounters trigger, are critically examined in eleven chapters which draw on a wide spectrum of examples from Europe and North America: from early modern antiquarians to archaeological societies and practitioners at work during the formative years of the modern archaeological disciplines and more recent examples from the twentieth century. The individual chapters engage with theoretical approaches to scientific creativity, knowledge production and interaction such as sociology and geographies of science, and actor-network theory (ANT) in their examination of individual–collective interplay. The book caters to readers both from within and outside the archaeological disciplines; primarily intended for researchers, teachers and students in archaeology, anthropology, classics and the history of science, it will also be of interest to the general reader.

Open Access (free)
A new labour market segmentation approach

This book presents new theories and international empirical evidence on the state of work and employment around the world. Changes in production systems, economic conditions and regulatory conditions are posing new questions about the growing use by employers of precarious forms of work, the contradictory approaches of governments towards employment and social policy, and the ability of trade unions to improve the distribution of decent employment conditions. Designed as a tribute to the highly influential contributions of Jill Rubery, the book proposes a ‘new labour market segmentation approach’ for the investigation of issues of job quality, employment inequalities, and precarious work. This approach is distinctive in seeking to place the changing international patterns and experiences of labour market inequalities in the wider context of shifting gender relations, regulatory regimes and production structures.

Implications for jobs and inequality
Rosemary Batt
and
Eileen Appelbaum

collective forms of representation? In this chapter we examine the original contributions Rubery and her colleagues have made to our understanding of the effects of the rise in outsourcing and production networks on work and workers. While the outcomes for workers continue to receive far less attention than warranted, some important new case-study and empirical research address these issues. We conclude with a discussion of directions for future research. Blurring boundaries and the employment relation Research on the networked organisation emerged in the 1980s and 1990s

in Making work more equal
The Last King of Scotland and post-imperial Scottish cinema
Christopher Meir

and Scottish cinema studies particularly (as seen in works by Martin-Jones [2009], Street [2009], Hjort [2010b] etc.), the failure to engage with this film is curious and problematic. This chapter seeks to fill this gap and in so doing, attempts to foreground the film’s transnational aspects at all levels of its existence while also resolutely insisting on its thematic engagement with Scottishness. As we will see, the ways in which the film was born out of a sophisticated multinational production network – one that is in many ways linked to the imper­ ial history of

in Scottish cinema
Laurie Parsons

decarbonising. The reality is far from it: an unregulated and unseen world of carbon-intensive production and local environmental destruction. This hidden world of global production is the new frontier of the fight against climate breakdown. Not only does it undermine our ability to tackle global emissions, but smaller-scale impacts too are hidden amidst the complex logistics of our global production networks. It is hidden because of the vast changes that have been underway in our societies and economies in the last half

in Carbon Colonialism
Paul Darby
,
James Esson
, and
Christian Ungruhe

been particularly germane to Africa's embeddedness in football's global production networks. For example, Article 19, which prohibits the international transfer of minors (defined as players under the age of eighteen), was included in the RSTP partly because of growing concerns in the late 1980s and early 1990s about the exploitative treatment encountered by African minors in the European football industry (Darby, 2000b ; Darby, Akindes and Kirwin, 2007 ; Donnelly and Petherick, 2004 ). As will become clear in the next chapter, this rule had the unintended

in African football migration
Abstract only
H. R. French
and
R. W. Hoyle

road joined the main highway between the Suffolk cloth town and borough of Sudbury and Colchester. Thus situated, Earls Colne was well placed to receive a good deal of passing traffic and trade. As the survey of the occupational structure of the town, below, demonstrates, the economy of Earls Colne was stimulated, and to a large extent shaped, by its proximity to Colchester. These connections are important. Earls Colne was not simply an isolated agricultural community. As we shall see, it was enmeshed in the textile production networks of Colchester and the Colne

in The character of English rural society
Paul Darby
,
James Esson
, and
Christian Ungruhe

This chapter draws attention to the diverse pathways and players’ experiences as they negotiate initial transnational moves to Europe and South-East Asia. It also examines the implications that the pathways and experiences have for a player’s career trajectory. Whether following conventional pathways or less formalised routes, the ability to navigate an uncertain and unpredictable industry is shown to be a key asset for African players. The chapter also illustrates how power imbalances in the social infrastructure of football’s global production network often leaves players in a marginalised position. Many experience fraud or are left with few opportunities to achieve their aspiration to make it in professional football and ‘become a somebody’. This is a harsh reality of labouring in a highly competitive, speculative and commercialised industry. It also reflects the tension between the interests of powerful actors and those of the player. This tension is visible in both Europe and South-East Asia. In this way, players moving to these destinations share similar experiences of a challenging liminality. The chapter argues, however, that continuing to speculate on their physical capital and talent in this initial stage of a potential professional career abroad should not be seen as an act of naivety or despair. Instead, the belief in one’s abilities and a strategic pursuit of the futures they envisage is indicative of considerable resilience.

in African football migration