himself in his own thought to such a height of power. Without doubt when a man is scornful of being like other men he becomes like the rebellious and cast out devil.] While containing all the familiar tropes of the angelic fall, this allusion also suggests that ordinary men can be gelic (‘like’) rebel angels through the corruption of their intellect and the desire for ‘synderlices ealdordomes’ (separate sovereignty). The prose thus narrates a shift in likeness, with the state of being ‘ gelic oðrum monnum’ (like other men) giving way to the

in Rebel angels
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Seán O’Faoláin and the generation of The Bell

Rebel by Vocation: Seán O’Faoláin and the Generation of The Bell tells the story of O’Faoláin and The Bell through the characters and writers that surrounded its offices in Dublin. It is the emergence of a post-independence national character that The Bell best embodies and this theme will be examined throughout the monograph to produce the first comprehensive ‘biography’ of this seminal literary journal, focussing on the dominant personality in its early years in Seán O’Faoláin with important excursions into the lives of the other principal contributors. It is based on exciting new archival research on O’Faoláin and his co-editor Peadar O’Donnell, who drew around them a generation of diverse and talented writers in The Bell that flourished in the shadows of W.B. Yeats and James Joyce. Drawing comparisons with other literary movements in America and the United Kingdom, this work shows the early influences on O’Faoláin’s writing during the first half of the twentieth century and reveals the complexity of his thought on topics as varied as religion, censorship, the Irish novel and republicanism. This book will challenge the accepted thesis that lauds O’Faoláin and The Bell as the voice of an independent, intellectual, and cultural elite in Ireland, and complicates the received wisdom on its relationship to censorship, the church, and the state.

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Space and sovereignty in Anglo-Saxon England

Over six hundred years before John Milton’s Paradise Lost, Anglo-Saxon authors told their own version of the fall of the angels. This book brings together various cultural moments, literary genres, and relevant comparanda to recover that story, from the legal and social world to the realm of popular spiritual ritual and belief. The story of the fall of the angels in Anglo-Saxon England is the story of a successfully transmitted exegetical teaching turned rich literary tradition that can be traced through a diverse range of genres: sermons, saints’ lives, royal charters, riddles, as well as devotional and biblical poetry, each genre offering a distinct window into the ancient myth’s place within the Anglo-Saxon literary and cultural imagination.

verbal formulae). 5 Alongside his interest in preserving the spiritual wholeness of his realm, Wulfstan frequently evokes well-entrenched ideas about biblical lore and salvation history in an effort to convey his message to the English Christian community at large. Whereas the earliest Benedictine reformers sought to establish a religious identity for themselves as ‘replacements’ by seizing lands and reclaiming spaces from ‘rebel’ clerics in the name of a holier English monasticism, the writings of Wulfstan and other late Anglo-Saxon authors betray a different set

in Rebel angels

3 British narratives of the rebel in Libya This chapter will retell a romantic story of rebellion by indicating the persistence of a romantic story about the rebel from the period of romanticism via romantic representations in movies such as Lawrence of Arabia to more current media reporting and parliamentary debates on rebels in the Libyan conflict in 2011. The romanticization of the rebels in Libya is somewhat unsurprising as they represent actors who are considered to be fighting on the same side as the Western ‘us’ against an evil Gaddafi ‘other’. Yet, the

in Romantic narratives in international politics

region, which was more firmly prepared for the condition of eternity by the part of its destruction.] The influence of Gregory’s ideas concerning creation and salvation history looms large in Anglo-Saxon narratives recounting the fall of the rebel angels and their unhappy fate. Of particular note here is his suggestion that heavenly space, first compromised by insurrection and treachery, is ‘solidius instructa’ (more firmly prepared) for future inhabitants once the rebels have been expelled. Werferth rendered this as follows: Ac hwylc wundor is, þeah þe we þis be

in Rebel angels
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response: ‘Forþan þe God gemynte þæt he wolde þæs mannes synne gehælan, na þæs deofles’ (Because God determined that he would heal the sin of man, not the devil’s). 1 Indeed, no traces of the overreaching pride of Lucifer, the war in heaven, or the fall of the rebel angels are to be found in Genesis, although certain verses in other biblical books were thought to allude to it. 2 On some level, Ælfric must have viewed Alcuin’s response to his pupil as satisfactory. His Old English translation follows the Anglo-Latin text with general fidelity. However, the eleventh

in Rebel angels
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the analogy between rebel clerics and rebel angels. We begin with the story of St Guthlac. In Vercelli 23, 1 the last homily in the Vercelli collection, a throng of demons ‘slidan’ (slide) out of the sky to capture Guthlac: hie hine læddon in þam andrysenlicum fiðerum betuh ða caldan facu þære lyfte. Þa he ða wæs on þære heannesse þære lyfte up gelæded, þa geseah he ealne norðdæl heofones swylce he wære þam sweartestum wolcnum afylled swiðra genipa. 2 [they carried him on terrible wings among the cold divisions of the air. When he was then carried up into the

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then interrupts with, ‘I was er then thou’. Whereas Vernon focuses on the vexed relationship between Lucifer and humankind, as well as the question of seniority, the Pearl poet emphasises the fraught relationship between Lucifer and God in Cleanness , which describes how Lucifer (the ‘falce fende’) and the rebel angels fall from heaven like a powerful snowstorm (‘snaw þikke’): For þe fyrste felonye þe falce fende wroȝt Whyl he watz hyȝe in þe heuen houen vpon lofte, Of alle þyse aþel

in Rebel angels

Irish accounts such as Saltair na Rann (‘Psalter of the Quatrains’) and Lebor Gabála Érenn (‘Book of the Taking of Ireland’), Satan views humankind as rival-inheritors of lands to which he feels entitled. Neither of these accounts has received much scholarly attention. In these narratives Lucifer upsets clearly defined spatial and social limits. He rebels not simply in opposition to the exaltation of Adam, but in response to the division of wealth and the parcelling out of authority and property. In Saltair na Rann a conflict arises between Adam and Lucifer over

in Rebel angels