The question of land in Ireland has long been at the heart of political, social and cultural debates. In eleven essays a group of authors including some of the most influential historians and social scientists of modern Ireland, and up-and-coming scholars, explore Ireland's land questions in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which presents the current state of our understanding of the issue of land in Ireland in two survey essays that cover the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The book's second section presents a series of reflections in which historians and social scientists look back on how they have approached the topic of land in Ireland in their earlier writings. A third section presents some innovative new research on various aspects of the Irish land question.

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Christine Carpenter

between the geographies of religion and land went further than this. The grants of the gentry, including benefactions to religious houses, education, roads, bridges and the parish churches of secondary residences, can normally be closely connected to the distribution of their estates. As this point implies, the pattern of donations also closely mirrored the position of a family within the hierarchy of

in Gentry culture in late-medieval England
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Steven Hutchinson

religious conduct seem to converge in the notion of infidelity: unchaste Christian women are prone to becoming renegadas , infidels. But ideology intervenes as writers of fiction are loath to allow renegade women to stay permanently in Muslim lands. While the rest of the Spaniards in this novel die at each other’s hands in Tunis, Argelina alone survives and manages to return repentant to recover the religion and land of her birth, renouncing what she has become along with the pleasures and unbridled eroticism of orientalised frontier space. Argelina bears little

in Frontier narratives
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Steven Hutchinson

in an equally jocular tone with a similar description of another young woman who can serve him – the epistolary exchange is attuned to a tradition that maximises the erotic aura of a slave woman being sold. In the Christian-European imaginary of the time, slave women opened up a space of eroticism and sexuality different from those of marriage, prostitution and adultery, among others. As the soaring prices of Muslim slave women confirm, the presence of a beautiful young slave woman, moderately exotic in body and attire and Muslim in religion and land of origin

in Frontier narratives