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Between promise and practice
Author: Darren Halpin

Whether called pressure groups, NGOs, social movement organisations or organised civil society, the value of ‘groups’ to the policy process, to economic growth, to governance, to political representation and to democracy has always been contested. However, there seems to be a contemporary resurgence in this debate, largely centred on their democratising potential: can groups effectively link citizens to political institutions and policy processes? Are groups an antidote to emerging democratic deficits? Or do they themselves face challenges in demonstrating their legitimacy and representativeness? This book debates the democratic potential and practice of groups, focusing on the vibrancy of internal democracies, and modes of accountability with those who join such groups and to the constituencies they advocate for. It draws on literatures covering national, European and global levels, and presents empirical material from the UK and Australia.

Television drama and the politics and aesthetics of identity

This book poses the question as to whether, over the last thirty years, there have been signs of ‘progress’ or ‘progressiveness’ in the representation of ‘marginalised’ or subaltern identity categories within television drama in Britain and the US. In doing so, it interrogates some of the key assumptions concerning the relationship between aesthetics and the politics of identity that have influenced and informed television drama criticism during this period. The book functions as a textbook because it provides students with a pathway through complex, wide-reaching and highly influential interdisciplinary terrain. Yet its re-evaluation of some of the key concepts that dominated academic thought in the twentieth century also make it of interest to scholars and specialists. Chapters examine ideas around politics and aesthetics emerging from Marxist-socialism and postmodernism, feminism and postmodern feminism, anti-racism and postcolonialism, queer theory and theories of globalisation, so as to evaluate their impact on television criticism and on television as an institution. These discussions are consolidated through case studies that offer analyses of a range of television drama texts including Big Women, Ally McBeal, Supply and Demand, The Bill, Second Generation, Star Trek (Enterprise), Queer as Folk, Metrosexuality and The Murder of Stephen Lawrence.

Metrosexuality and The Murder of Stephen Lawrence
Geraldine Harris

M410 HARRIS TEXT.qxd 20/7/06 11:35 AM Page 169 Phil's G4 Phil's G4:Users:phil:Public Conclusion: beyond (simple) representation? Metrosexuality and The Murder of Stephen Lawrence The context of Russell T. Davis’s remark, ‘No good drama ever comes out of representation’, cited at the end of Chapter 5, suggests that he is referring to simple, positive representation but also to the notion of ‘representation’ in terms of attempting to speak for, to and about a specific group as a whole. In this conclusion, I want to use this comment as a starting point for

in Beyond representation
(Re)calibrating democratic expectations
Darren Halpin

this type of arrangement between groups and members. It follows that where many groups are found to ‘fail’ to embody this set of arrangements, the democratic basis for engaging groups more closely with governing processes is thrown into doubt. In this chapter it is argued that the representation account does not serve us well in terms of setting the metrics with which one may go on to interpret empirical evidence of group democratic practice. Several objections are set out. It is maintained here that the expectations set by this frame are

in Groups, representation and democracy
Constance Duncombe

Representation is a powerful force in world politics. As the production of meaning developed through language, symbols or signs, it is a significant factor in how we both construct reality and enact our performance of it. Representation conveys a particular understanding of the world around us, which is temporally situated and informed by events over time. Representation exposes power relationships and asymmetries that exist within practices of identity politics, precisely because representation is a form of abstraction and interpretation. 1

in Representation, recognition and respect in world politics
The case of Iran–US relations

This book addresses a critical issue in global politics: how recognition and misrecognition fuel conflict or initiate reconciliation. The main objective of this book is to demonstrate how representations of one state by another influence foreign policymaking behaviour. The key argument is that representations are important because they shape both the identity of a state and how it is recognised by others. States respond to representations of themselves that do not fit with how they wish to be recognised. The book provides a thorough conceptual engagement with the issues at stake and a detailed empirical investigation of the fraught bilateral relations between the United States and Iran, which is perhaps one of the most significant flashpoints in global politics today. Despite Iran and the US finally reaching an agreement on the nuclear issue that allows Iran limited nuclear technological capacity in exchange for the lifting of certain sanctions, the US withdrew from the deal in May 2018. However, questions remain about how best to explain the initial success of this deal considering the decades of animosity between Iran and the US, which have previously scuppered any attempts on both sides to reach an amicable agreement. Increasing concerns about declining Iran–US relations under the Trump administration suggest even more so the power of recognition and misrecognition in world politics. Scholars and strategists alike have struggled to answer the question of how this deal was made possible, which this book addresses.

Abstract only
Alex Mold

2 Representation Patient autonomy did not just concern more say for individuals. Collective representation of the interests of patient-consumers as a whole was an important issue during the late 1960s and early 1970s. At this time, the notion that the patient-consumer should be represented within health services gathered political and practical impetus. A critical development was the creation of the CHCs. Formed as part of the reorganisation of the NHS in 1973, 207 CHCs were established in England and Wales, with similar bodies in Scotland and Northern Ireland

in Making the patient-consumer
Constance Duncombe

foreign policy decisions, the struggle for recognition can be seen to inform the motives behind its pursuit of nuclear power despite opposition. The struggle for recognition therefore unfolds not in a materialist sense of physical power but in an ideational one that underlies the desire to have moral authority over our own representation, to be recognised in a way that effectively demands respect from others. 2 These representations therefore continue to contribute to forms of misunderstanding or misrecognition that permeate any

in Representation, recognition and respect in world politics
Abstract only
Diasporic subjectivities and ‘race relations’ dramas (Supply and Demand, The Bill, Second Generation)
Geraldine Harris

, in these terms, British crime drama had become any more (or less) progressive, since earlier in the decade Jim Pines asked whether it could be defined as ‘inherently racist’ (Pines, 1995). Pines pursues this question in relation to form but also to genre, authorship and representation. In the first part of this chapter I want to contextualise Pines’ concerns in relation to thinking within anti-racist and postcolonial theory, with particular reference to the rejection of realism in favour of a ‘diaspora aesthetic’. Returning to Pines’ argument and the crime genre

in Beyond representation
Romantic attractions and queer dilemmas (Queer as Folk)
Geraldine Harris

M410 HARRIS TEXT.qxd 20/7/06 11:35 AM Page 138 Phil's G4 Phil's G4:Users:phil:Public 5 Only human nature after all? Romantic attractions and queer dilemmas (Queer as Folk) As I noted in the introduction, in 1998 Michael Jackson, the controller of Channel 4, used Queer as Folk (1998) to imply a narrative of progress in that channel’s representation of ‘minority groups’. A similar narrative of progress, specifically in relation to gay and lesbian subjects, is also suggested by the article which appears on the pages of the BBC website devoted to Tipping the

in Beyond representation