Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14,595 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Sara Callahan

Art and research. These two terms have become ever more entangled since the late 1990s: artists and curators now routinely describe their work as research or research-based. The resulting objects, whether material or immaterial, are examinations, case studies, explorations, surveys, investigations, enquiries or interrogations into particular phenomena or sets of questions – preferably with ‘critical’ added as a prefix. Aesthetic references to research are also common. Artworks and exhibitions often include objects that look like research

in Art + Archive
What the humanities and social sciences can contribute to laboratory animal science and welfare
Series: Inscriptions

Animal research is part of a complex web of relations made up of humans and animals, practices inside and outside the laboratory, formal laws and professional norms, and social imaginaries of the past and future of medicine. Researching Animal Research sets out an innovative approach for understanding and intervening in the social practices that constitute animal research. It proposes the idea of the animal research nexus to draw attention to the connections that make up animal research today and to understand how these elements have become entangled over time. The authors examine moves towards openness, inclusion, and interdisciplinarity in science, and open up questions that move debates beyond polarised pro- and anti-public positions. The book is written as a collaboration and conversation between historians, geographers, sociologists, anthropologists, science and technology studies scholars, and engagement professionals, with commentaries from the arts, social sciences, and animal research sector. Through detailed qualitative analysis of regulation, care, expertise, and public engagement the book offers an unparalleled picture of the changing cultures, practices, and policies of UK animal research. By incorporating critical commentaries and examples of creative practices, it also seeks to animate and potentially transform the animal research nexus that it describes. As the social imaginaries and regulations around animal research continue to change in the UK and beyond, this book is a vital interdisciplinary contribution to the search for new ways to conduct and research animal research today.

Abstract only
Margaret Brazier
,
Emma Cave
, and
Rob Heywood

18.1 Introduction In the COVID-19 pandemic, vaccines were the product of remarkable collaboration, funding and effort, and of the willingness of volunteers to be involved in their research and development. But volunteering to be a research participant is not risk-free. In 2006, six healthy volunteers at Northwick Park Hospital 2 were

in Medicine, patients and the law
Abstract only
Margaret Brazier
and
Emma Cave

. The shocking incident at Northwick Park continued a trend of diminishing confidence in the regulation of research. In 2000, inquiries were held into allegations that research was carried out on newborn babies without parental consent in a hospital in North Staffordshire. 6 Scandals surrounding retention of body parts originated in Bristol and Liverpool with evidence of children’s body parts being retained for research without their parents’ consent or knowledge. 7 And in 2010 Andrew Wakefield was struck off the medical register for serious professional misconduct

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Abstract only
Margaret Brazier
,
Emma Cave
, and
Rob Heywood

15.1 The status of the embryo and embryo research 1 The legal and moral status of the human embryo continues to attract controversy. For the devout Roman Catholic and many others, life is given by God and begins at conception, thus the deliberate destruction of an embryo, be it in the course of embryo research, or by abortion (which we

in Medicine, patients and the law
A Qualitative Panel Study and workplace studies
Torben Krings
,
Elaine Moriarty
,
James Wickham
,
Alicja Bobek
, and
Justyna Salamońska

2 Researching migration: a Qualitative Panel Study and workplace studies In this chapter, we outline the research methodology of our study. The core of the research was a Qualitative Panel Study (QPS) with a group of twenty-two Polish migrants in Ireland. We first discuss the rationale for choosing a QPS to study Polish migrants in the Irish labour market. We argue that such a study represents an innovative methodological tool to examine the worklife pathways of migrants in a dynamic manner and to illuminate the new mobility patterns of East–West migration. We

in New mobilities in Europe
Mattias Frey
and
Sara Janssen

This introduction to the Film Studies special issue on Sex and the Cinema considers the special place of sex as an object of inquiry in film studies. Providing an overview of three major topic approaches and methodologies – (1) representation, spectatorship and identity politics; (2) the increasing scrutiny of pornography; and (3) new cinema history/media industries studies – this piece argues that the parameters of and changes to the research of sex, broadly defined, in film studies reflect the development of the field and discipline since the 1970s, including the increased focus on putatively ‘low’ cultural forms, on areas of film culture beyond representation and on methods beyond textual/formal analysis.

Film Studies
Theory and practice

Considering how to communicate your research or engage others with the latest science, social science or humanities research? This book explores new and emerging approaches to engaging people with research, placing these in the wider context of research communication. Split into three sections, Creative Research Communication explores the historical routes and current drivers for public engagement, before moving on to explore practical approaches and finally discussing ethical issues and the ways in which research communication can contribute to research impact.

Starting from the premise that researchers can and ought to participate in the public sphere, this book provides practical guidance and advice on contributing to political discourse and policymaking, as well as engaging the public where they are (whether that is at the theatre, at a music festival or on social media). By considering the plurality of publics and their diverse needs and interests, it is quite possible to find a communications niche that neither offers up bite-sized chunks of research, nor conceptualises the public as lacking the capacity to consider the myriad of issues raised by research, but explains and considers thoughtfully the value of research endeavours and their potential benefits to society.

It’s time for researchers to move away from one-size fits all, and embrace opportunities for creative approaches to research communication. This book argues for a move away from metrics and tick box approaches and towards approaches that work for you, as an individual researcher, in the context of your own discipline and interests.

Peter E. Pormann
and
Rachel Beckett
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library

This handbook is written for patients and members of the public who want to understand more about the approaches, methods and language used by health-services researchers. Patient and public involvement (PPI) in research is now a requirement of most major health-research programmes, and this book is designed to equip these individuals with the knowledge and skills necessary for meaningful participation. Edited by award-winning mental-health researchers, the book has been produced in partnership with mental-health-service users and carers with experience of research involvement. It includes personal reflections from these individuals alongside detailed information on quantitative, qualitative and health-economics research methods, and comprehensively covers all the basics needed for large-scale health research projects: systematic reviews; research design and analysis using both qualitative and quantitative approaches; health economics; research ethics; impact and dissemination. This book was developed during a five-year research programme funded by the UK’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) called Enhancing the Quality of User Involved Care Planning in Mental Health Services (EQUIP). The handbook clearly outlines research practices, and gives an insight into how public and patient representatives can be involved in them and shape decisions. Each chapter ends with a reflective exercise, and there are also some suggested sources of additional reading. People who get involved in health research as experts from experience now have a textbook to support their research involvement journey.