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American negativity and rap/metal in the age of supercapitalism
Author: Scott Wilson

The seductive force of American supercapitalism unlocks new markets, unleashing the energy of desire, and provides a destructive version of Satan's rage. At the vanguard of this seduction has been the youthful rage and rebellion of the devil's music, American rock 'n' roll and its multiple related subgenres. This book looks at the most pervasive forms of American popular music in the post-cold-war period. Gangsta rap exploits and informs the consumption of luxury brands. The 'mom and pop rage' of the nu metal bands self-consciously exposes itself as the violent expression, the excess of the implacable banal excess, and of shopping-mall consumerism. The book explores the negativity and the 'niggativity' of American rap/metal in the 1990s in relation to a number of key events in the decade such as the Rodney King riots and the Columbine High School massacre. On the face of it, the gangsta 'nigga' is an unlikely point of identification for suburban white culture. But the phenomenon of the 'wigga' (white, wanna-be-nigga) and the success of companies like Nike testify to the fascination that such a figure holds. Rage Against the Machine (also known as Rage or RATM) do not normally have problems with machines, indeed their music and living depend upon them. Rather, the 'machine' is for Rage another word for the new world order of global capitalism. Death metal groups such as Morbid Angel and Deicide aim to outdo the others in its singular relation to death, shock and outrage.

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The difference a crisis makes
Josef W. Konvitz

of co-ordinating urban development with technological innovation, environmental pressures, regulatory reform, and global economic change. Three disasters in 1992, coincidentally all in the United States, dramatically framed how ill-prepared even the most advanced economies of the world were at that time to meet these challenges. We are perhaps less well placed today. The year 1992 was that in which a break in the wall of an abandoned utility tunnel under the Chicago River flooded the Chicago Loop (the central business district), when the Rodney King riots which

in Cities and crisis
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Scott Wilson

neoconservative followers of Strauss and Kojève, and the rap/metal subcultural manifestations of anti-capitalism have a deeply ambivalent relation to consumer culture. The chapter examines the paradoxes inherent to these two apparently opposed, and yet structurally similar positions, and discloses how they emerge out of the negative dialectic of desire itself. Introduction 11 The next seven chapters explore the negativity and the ‘niggativity’ of American rap/metal in the 1990s in relation to a number of key events in the decade such as the Rodney King riots and the

in Great Satan’s rage
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Scott Wilson

(for an account of the reception of ‘Black Korea’ and the Korean-American response, see Chang, 2005: 346–52). On 5 November, Soon Ja Du was sentenced to 5 years on probation, to the outrage of many in the African-American community. Five months later, all five LAPD officers were acquitted of the assault on Rodney King. Riots ensued, enabled partly by the brief ‘truce’ between Cripps and Bloods sets, the repressive police action having had the brief effect of unifying many to join ‘the same gang’ in the war against the ‘war on youth’ (see Chang, 2005: 381–92). The

in Great Satan’s rage
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Passing and writing in The White Boy Shuffle and The Human Stain
Sinéad Moynihan

to furnish them with ‘her vaunted “traditional black experience.” ’ 2 Gunnar’s adolescent rite of passage, therefore, is to pass – to become ‘black.’ In Hillside, Gunnar befriends a jazz aficionado called Nicholas Scoby, comes to excel at basketball and poetry-writing and, against the backdrop of the Rodney King riots of 1992, helps local gangster Psycho Loco to open a safe looted from a department store. While Caucasia and Middlesex are fictions of adolescence, The White Boy Shuffle is a mock Bildungsroman, more obviously setting up the conventions of the

in Passing into the present