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a New Proof State of the Battle of the Romans and the Sabines
Lisa Pon

The John Rylands Library’s recently rediscovered Spencer Album 8050 contains a proof state of the Battle of the Romans and the Sabines, an engraving pivotal in the short-lived but ambitious collaboration between Jacopo Caraglio (1500–65) and Rosso Fiorentino (1495–1540) in Rome. This proof impression was first printed in black ink, and then densely covered with hand-drawn ink. A comparison between the new proof state and previously identified states of the engraving using a novel technical approach involving long-wave infrared light to isolate the printed lines optically indicates that the Spencer proof state precedes any other known state of the engraving. The use of penwork and printing on this early proof and subsequent proof states demonstrates how Caraglio and Rosso saw drawing and printing as intimately connected, iterative steps in the print’s production.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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96 96 1 1 Four Nineteenth-Century Book of the Dead Forgeries on Mummy Linen in the John Rylands Library, or: the Description de l’Égypte as a Faker’s Master Copy Kockelmann Holger 01 03 2020 01 03 2020 96 96 1 1 1 1 24 24 1 10.7227/BJRL.96.1.1 David Forrest, the Scottish Reformer and a Reattributed Provenance of a Calvin Commentary in the John Rylands Library Forrest Martin A. 01 03 2020 01 03 2020 96 96 1 1 25 25 43 43 2 10.7227/BJRL.96.1.2 Caraglio and Rosso Fiorentino between Pen and Press a New Proof State of the Battle of the Romans and the

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Sam Rohdie

comparison. In Mamma Roma, Ettore is compared to Mantegna’s The Dead Christ and the wedding banquet of whores, pimps and thieves to The Last Supper of Da Vinci. In La ricotta, Stracci on the cross is likened to Christ on the cross, specifically a Christ on the cross in the paintings of the Deposition by Rosso Fiorentino and Pontormo, the low like the high, the profane like the sacred, the real like the image as if in a maze

in Montage
Andy Campbell

notions of gender, camp, and patriarchy. Comparative examples such as Kenneth Anger’s Fireworks (1947) and Edward Burra’s Silver Dollar Bar (1955) are briefly brought to bear in his analysis. This positions Tom more intently as part of a larger networked world of queer image-makers. Of course, this tactic can go too far as well—Taschen’s 2009 tome, appropriately titled Tom of Finland XXL (for both the large size of the book itself and the size of Tom’s figures and their endowments), compares Tom’s work to that of Michelangelo, Rosso Fiorentino, Paul Cadmus, and Japanese

in Bound together