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Neoliberal crisis, neoliberal solutions

Once held up as a 'poster child' for untrammeled capitalist globalisation, the Irish Republic has more recently come to represent a cautionary tale for those tempted to tread the same neoliberal path. The crash in the world economy had especially grave repercussions for Ireland, and a series of austerity measures has seen the country endure the most substantial 'adjustment' ever experienced in a developed society during peacetime. This book delineates the reactionary course that Ireland has followed since the ignominious demise of the Celtic Tiger. It argues that the forces of neoliberalism have employed the economic crisis they caused to advance policies that are in their own narrow interests, and that the host of regressive measures imposed since the onset of global recession has fundamentally restructured Irish society. The book discusses the mechanisms by which finance in Ireland sustains and reproduces itself, in particular how it was able to protect itself during the 2008 crisis. Property was at the centre of the second phase of the Celtic Tiger boom after US investment in manufacturing began to decline, leading to the Irish economic crash. The years since the onset of the recession in Ireland in 2008 have been characterised not by passivity and quietism but by extreme violence. In December 2009 as part of the first wave of austerity, the Community Development Project was informed that the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs proposed not to continue funding the project beyond the end of 2009.

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Paul Sargent

Executive; FÁS; and the Departments of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs; Education and Science; and Health and Children’ (2008b: 11). The establishment of such networks between statutory agencies reflects the increasing pace at which the state is becoming governmentalised. This represents a major sea change in juvenile justice policy with the state taking centre stage, a space formerly occupied by religious and voluntary organisations for most of the twentieth century. The publication of the National Youth Justice Strategy, like the establishment of the Office of

in Wild Arabs and savages
Diaspora for development?
Mark Boyle, Rob Kitchin and Delphine Ancien

, but it also serves to promote Ireland and Irish-mindedness. Ciste na Gaeilge of the Irish Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs is a fund which supports the teaching of Irish at third institutions outside of Ireland. Students sit the TEG (European Certificate) examinations upon completing the course, and the most successful students are provided with scholarships to intensive summer courses in Carraroe, Co. Galway. A different type of scheme is that run by the Aisling Return to Ireland Project, financed under the Emigrant Support Programme, which

in Migrations
Bernadette Connaughton

& Tourism Community Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs Communications, Energy & Natural Resources Defence Education & Science Enterprise, Trade & Employment Environment, Heritage & Local Government Finance Foreign Affairs Agriculture, Fisheries & Food Arts Sport & Tourism Community Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs Communications, Energy and Natural Resources Health and Children Justice, Equality & Law Reform Social & Family Affairs Taoiseach Transport Education & Science Enterprise, Trade & Employment Environment, Heritage & Local Government Finance and the Public Service Foreign

in Europeanisation and new patterns of governance in Ireland
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The Community Workers’ Co-operative
Joe Larragy

pyrrhic victory: The Community Workers’ Co-­operative 149 as later reflected in the CWC’s own review, control of RAPID was split and shunted between three line departments before settling in the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs (DCRAGA), and the oversight structures were very complicated.19 In contrast to this the CWC model had sought devolution of budgets to the community sector, stating: ‘Budgets should be made available to independent national community work organisations such as the Community Workers’ Co-­op, to build community capacity and

in Asymmetric engagement
Martha Doyle

policy-making process. The discussion below expands on the formal methods for participation, namely, consultations and partnerships at the national and local levels. Participation mechanisms at the national level Policies concerning older people are cross-departmental and consequently span a range of policy-making government departments including the Departments of Health and Children, Social Protection, Finance, Transport and Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs. In January 2007 the government formally announced the establishment of a new office, Junior Minister of

in The politics of old age
Chris McInerney

, at its peak in 2005, funded over 180 local and independent Community Development Projects (CDPs) with a specific anti-­ poverty focus and a local management structure. By 2012, following a series of decisions taken by the responsible parent department, the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs, all bar a small number of projects were subsumed into the state and EU funded local development companies. The rationale for ending the programme of support for independent community organisations was largely constructed on the grounds of duplication and

in Challenging times, challenging administration
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Austerity and the community sector in the Republic of Ireland
John Bissett

toward ‘addressing poverty and social exclusion’. Twenty years later, in December 2009 as part of the first wave of austerity, the CDP was informed that the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs proposed not to continue funding the project beyond the end of 2009. In effect this meant that North Clondalkin CDP ceased to function from 31 December 2009. The project was one of the first CDPs to be closed in Ireland in what was very much a harbinger of things to come. The project was a casualty of the view that there was ‘little evidence of positive outcomes

in Ireland under austerity
Chris McInerney

also important to note that the mechanism though which such funding was provided had also changed in a quite dramatic way, from a pattern of more dispersed funding through different departments and statutory bodies to one where one government department, namely the now extinct Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs, exerted significant funding control (Harvey, 2008). Hence, the potential emerged for relations with a large number of civil society groups to be dictated by the ethos, understanding and perspectives of one Minister and a small group of civil

in Challenging times, challenging administration
Chris McInerney

height the CPA contributed an evidence based, policy perspective; managed and supported funding programmes designed to build local and national civil society capacity; produced public information and provided an accessible point of contact between the state and civil society organisations on issues of poverty. In more recent years the role of the CPA changed and its range of activities were gradually narrowed, for example: • in 2002, responsibility for the Community Development Programme1 transferred to the newly established Department of Community Rural and Gaeltacht

in Challenging times, challenging administration