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Crime as urban fabric in São Paulo
Author: Gabriel Feltran

This book tells the story of the ‘world of crime’ in São Paulo. In so doing, it presents a new framework to understand urban conflict in many other contexts. Chapters are based on ethnographic fieldwork started in 1997, when Brazil's elites still hoped to achieve the integration of the country into a modern global order, and of the urban poor into a prosperous nation. Both integration projects placed their hopes in the city of São Paulo. The metropolitan region had grown in population from 2.6 million in 1950, to 12.5 million in 1980. This demographic explosion manifested in the rapid expansion of self-constructed favelas, clandestine subdivisions and working-class neighbourhoods. Besides migration, the central pillars for the occupation of these territories until the 1980s were factory work, the family and Catholic religiosity. These pillars have shifted radically since urbanisation. Schooling, access to services and urban infrastructure, although still precarious, have all grown considerably. Rural to urban migration slowed; there was a dramatic transition in popular religious practices and average fertility plummeted from 7.1 to 1.4 children per woman in just 40 years. Since then, two generations have been born and grown up in an urban world radically different from that in which their parents lived. However, it is the expansion of the ‘world of crime’ – a social universe and form of everyday authority established around global illegal markets that would most radically transform the social dynamics of the city.

Abstract only
Gabriel Feltran

Introduction The research for this book began in 1997, when Brazil’s elites still hoped to achieve the integration of the country into a modern global order, and of the urban poor into a prosperous nation. Both integration projects placed their hopes in the city of São Paulo. The largest metropolis in South America, it was at the centre of the national economy and the drive for modernisation; it had the country’s largest industrial sector and received millions of rural migrants from the 1950s to the 1980s. Within the space of thirty years, the population of the

in The entangled city
Gabriel Feltran

4 Crime and punishment in the city: repertories of justice and homicides in São Paulo When faced with everyday situations that they consider to be unjust, residents of São Paulo’s peripheries may appeal to different sources of authority in pursuit of justice. The choice of which authority to approach depends on the type of problem in question. For example, if a man has a job and for years has not received the overtime to which he is legally entitled, he will go to a labour tribunal. If a mother does not receive the alimony owed by her ex-husband, she will

in The entangled city
Marco Aurelio Guimarães, Raffaela Arrabaça Francisco, Martin Evison, Edna Sadayo Miazato Iwamura, Carlos Eduardo Palhares Machado, Ricardo Henrique Alves da Silva, Maria Eliana Castro Pinheiro, Diva Santana and Julie Alvina Guss Patrício

Exhumation may be defined as the legally sanctioned excavation and recovery of the remains of lawfully buried or – occasionally – cremated individuals, as distinct from forensic excavations of clandestinely buried remains conducted as part of a criminal investigation and from unlawful disinterment of human remains, commonly referred to as bodysnatching. The aim of this article is to review the role of exhumation – so defined – in the activities of CEMEL, the Medico-Legal Centre of the Ribeirão Preto Medical School-University of São Paulo, in international, regional and local collaborations. Exhumations form part of routine forensic anthropology casework; scientific research in physical and forensic anthropology; and forensic casework conducted in collaboration with the Brazilian Federal Police; and are carried out as part of humanitarian investigations into deaths associated with the civil–military dictatorship of 1964 to 1985. This article aims to offer a non-technical summary – with reference to international comparative information – of the role of exhumation in investigative and scientific work and to discuss developments in their historical and political context.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
São Paulo’s apparatus for homicide management
Gabriel Feltran

6 Government produces crime, crime produces government: São Paulo’s apparatus for homicide management This chapter offers a situated analysis of the specificities of São Paulo’s urban conflict, charting more than two decades of conflict between government policies and criminal policies in the management of lethal violence.1 In Chapter 4, I discussed the repertoire of normative regimes that pluralise the notion of justice in the peripheries of São Paulo, and of ways in which, over the years, a justice system overseen by ‘crime’ has come to coexist with regimes of

in The entangled city
Gabriel Feltran

, before asking if the sheet music Sidnei was carrying was for the cavaquinho2 to be played in the samba band on Saturday in Vila Prudente, another of São Paulo’s best-known favelas. Sidnei informed me that the pair were attending a music workshop he gave at CEDECA, in compliance with socio-educational measures taken due to their apprehension by the police two months earlier for stealing copper wiring from a building site. Kids ‘from the community’; Sidnei explained that they had ‘got caught up in the adventure of it’ and weren’t part of the ‘world of crime’. Our walk

in The entangled city
The boundaries of the ‘world of crime’ in São Paulo
Gabriel Feltran

2 Legitimacy in dispute: the boundaries of the ‘world of crime’ in São Paulo It is not possible to trace the boundaries of the ‘world of crime’ in relation to the broader social fabric without also examining the relations between this ‘world’ and social spheres considered legitimate, such as work, family, religion and so on. No boundary establishes a watertight division between two domains; rather, what any boundary seeks is to regulate the terms of the relationship, the flows (of people, goods, discourse, etc.) between them. A boundary, therefore, denotes a

in The entangled city
Abstract only
Gabriel Feltran

has not happened, and the hope of one 99 FELTRAN 9781526138248 PRINT.indd 99 13/01/2020 08:28 The entangled city day reuniting the family ended in August 2009, when Anísio was murdered. Ten years on, in 2019, the second generation started to be arrested and shot. This chapter presents ethnographic research with the family of Ivete, Neto’s mother, living in the favela of Jardim Elba, Sapopemba, in the East Zone of São Paulo.1 I describe how the cleavage between workers and bandidos operates differently in three dimensions of the family trajectory: (i) within the

in The entangled city
On essence and deconstruction
Gabriel Feltran

1 Boundaries of difference: on essence and deconstruction An eighty-six-year-old white woman watched television footage of São Paulo’s traditional New Year’s Eve road race dedicated to Saint Silvester and reflected on her past – another habit traditional at the year’s close – and on her stage in life. For Vitória, it was family gatherings like the one held that day that proved her efforts had been worth it. Widowed for a few years now, Vitória had just told me how much her life had improved over the years. The daughter of poor Italian immigrants who had arrived

in The entangled city
Cardboard publishers in Latin America
Lucy Bell

themselves, others, like Eloísa, have strengthened their links with waste pickers or recycling cooperatives. In one case in São Paulo, which I shall explore in depth here, the publishing workshop and processes have been fully integrated into an existing recycling plant. Why examine editoriales cartoneras in the context of a collection on literature and sustainability? Firstly, it is an intriguing instance of literary production in which the so-called ‘three pillars’ of sustainability – the environmental, the social and the economic – are invoked, intermeshed 76

in Literature and sustainability