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The Cypriot Mule corps, imperial loyalty and silenced memory

Most Cypriots and British today do not know that Cypriots even served in the Great War. This book contributes to the growing literature on the role of the British non-settler empire in the Great War by exploring the service of the Cypriot Mule Corps on the Salonica Front, and after the war in Constantinople. This book speaks to a number of interlocking historiographies, contributing to various debates especially around enlistment/volunteerism, imperial loyalty and veterans' issues. At the most basic level, it reconstructs the story of Cypriot Mule Corps' contribution, of transporting wounded men and supplies to the front, across steep mountains, with dangerous ravines and in extreme climates. The book argues that Cypriot mules and mule drivers played a pivotal role in British logistics in Salonica and Constantinople, especially the former. It explores the impact of the war on Cypriot socio-economic conditions, particularly of so many men serving abroad on the local economy and society. The issues that arose for the British in relation to the contracts they offered the Cypriots, contracts offered to the muleteers, and problems of implementing the promise of an allotment scheme are also discussed. Behavioural problems one finds with military corps, such as desertion and crime, were not prevalent in the Cypriot Mule Corps. The book also explores the impact of death and incapacity on veterans and dependants, looking at issues that veterans faced after returning and resettling into Cypriot life.

Andrekos Varnava

In summer 1916, the British authorities established the Cypriot Mule Corps for service in the British army at the Salonica Front. Officially styled the Macedonian Mule Corps, the majority of the men were Cypriots, not Macedonians. This chapter deals with its formation, answering why and how it was formed, why Cypriot mules and men were selected, and outlining the roles of the

in Serving the empire in the Great War
Andrekos Varnava

the lack of information and interest in the Cypriot Mule Corps. This study aims to rectify this historical omission and show why its inclusion has significance for various historical debates for and beyond Cyprus. Contemporary accounts and primary sources on the Cypriot Mule Corps Numerous primary accounts on the Salonica front also fail to mention much about the Cypriot Mule

in Serving the empire in the Great War
Borders in contemporary Macedonia
Rozita Dimova

Macedonia at the centre of the battles. The claims over the region of Macedonia were the main reason for the second Balkan war in 1913, when the former allies turned against each other – Serbia and Greece on one side and Bulgaria on the other. With the beginning of the First World War (which, as many historians argue, was a logical consequence of the second Balkan war that made Serbia a strong regional force through its victory in 1913 and its alliance with Russia), this border coincided almost literally with the Salonica front (Solunski Front), where Serbia, supported by

in The political materialities of borders