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This book is wholly devoted to assessing the array of links between Scotland and the Caribbean in the later eighteenth century. It uses a wide range of archival sources to paint a detailed picture of the lives of thousands of Scots who sought fortunes and opportunities, as Burns wrote, ‘across th' Atlantic roar’. The book outlines the range of their occupations as planters, merchants, slave owners, doctors, overseers and politicians, and shows how Caribbean connections affected Scottish society during the period of ‘improvement’. The book highlights the Scots' reinvention of the system of clanship to structure their social relations in the empire and finds that involvement in the Caribbean also bound Scots and English together in a shared Atlantic imperial enterprise and played a key role in the emergence of the British nation and the Atlantic world.

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Murray Stewart Leith and Duncan Sim

Introduction In our introduction, we sketched a picture of Scotland and Scottish society in which we sought to illustrate the nature of change that had produced this Scotland of the early twenty-first century. A Scotland that in the past few decades had undergone significant social, economic and most of all political change. We spoke of the huge shift in living conditions, of the nature of employment, of the social positioning of Scottish society from a very conservative to a more progressive form and of the underpinning movement of how the people of Scotland

in Scotland
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Douglas J. Hamilton

To make the transition from a Scotland in a state of flux to a Caribbean beset by enormous challenges, Scots drew on the support and patronage of their networks. These groupings were, at their most fundamental level, based on precisely the kind of social relations within kinships that had characterised Scottish society for generations. More significantly, these apparently archaic

in Scotland, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world 1750–1820
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Murray Stewart Leith and Duncan Sim

describe some of the historical patterns of migration and the groups who help to make up current Scottish society. Patterns of immigration up to the 1930s Undoubtedly the largest influx of migrants to Scotland occurred during the nineteenth century with the movement of Irish families following the potato famine. Some seasonal migration had taken place for many years with Irish workers seeking employment in agriculture, picking fruit and potatoes (MacRaild 2011 ), and this continued into the twentieth century. As migrant workers, they often lived in appalling

in Scotland
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Murray Stewart Leith and Duncan Sim

traditionally played a key role within Scottish society. Politics Scottish women were heavily involved in a number of political campaigns, for example the Glasgow rent strike, to which we have referred (Melling 1983 ), and in the struggle for women’s suffrage. The Edinburgh National Society for Women’s Suffrage, founded in 1867, was one of the first in Britain (Innes and Rendall 2006 ). As women became more politically involved, various women’s branches of the mainstream political parties were established, including the Women’s Liberal Federation, the Scottish branch of

in Scotland
Angela McCarthy

Britishness among Scots abroad, most evidence draws on toasts at Scottish Society events or occasions when Britishness was linked to royalty. 82 This book, therefore, generally finds support for John MacKenzie’s contention that the British Empire, rather than ‘creating an overall national identity [Britishness] . . . enabled the sub-nationalism of the United Kingdom to survive and flourish’. 83 This

in Scottishness and Irishness in New Zealand since 1840
Douglas J. Hamilton

to Britain to enjoy and consolidate their wealth. Scots often went back to the places from which they had originated, investing in various enterprises. The first part of this chapter deals with the impacts felt across Scotland of the return of Caribbean revenue, a feature of Scottish society that was evident to contemporaries. The authors of the 1791 account of Inverness in the Statistical account of Scotland

in Scotland, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world 1750–1820
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Paolo Dardanelli

Interest groups were the other key elite actors who played a crucial role in the politics of self-government. Some of them had a historical presence within Scottish society and/or a large membership which lent them a degree of representativeness in ‘interpreting’ public opinion and in turn to shape it even superior to that of political parties. The key groups analysed here are the Church of Scotland, the Scottish Trades Union Congress (STUC) and the business organisations. Following the pattern of chapter 2 , for each of these actors I

in Between two Unions
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Joseph Webster

-Orange imaginations of the machinations of Rome within Scottish society (see also McFarland 1990 : 90). Importantly, while it seems fair to refer to this type of conspiracism as an ‘imagination’ (insofar as I examine how these machinations are conceptualised, observed, narrated, connected, and believed), I deliberately want to avoid referring to them as ‘conspiracy theories’. This is because to do so would carry with it such a weight of scepticism and implied mockery that the resultant analysis would be undermined (see Robertson 2016 : 39). Instead, as outlined in the

in The religion of Orange politics
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Economies of high- and low-value human capital
Andrew Mackillop

Armed service constituted the most accessible route for metropolitan provincials hoping to participate in the Asian hemisphere of British imperialism. The use of military manpower as an export economy was a centuries-old characteristic of Irish and Scottish society by the time the Company began the build-up of its armed forces in the 1740s. 1 It is hardly surprising in these circumstances that the corporation’s fastest-growing sector of employment attracted soldier-entrepreneurs of varying social, confessional and regional backgrounds. The diversification of

in Human capital and empire