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From Tito to Milošević and beyond

This book offers a refreshing new analysis of the role of workers both in Tito’s Yugoslavia and in the subsequent Serbian revolution against Milošević in October 2000. The authors argue that Tito and the Communist leadership of Yugoslavia saw self-management as a modernising project to compete with the west, and as a disciplining tool for workers in the enterprise. The socialist ideals of self-management were subsequently corrupted by Yugoslavia’s turn to the market. The authors then move on to examine the central role of ordinary workers in overthrowing the nationalist regime of Milošević and present an account which runs contrary to many descriptions of ’labour weakness’ in post Communist states. Organised labour should be studied as a movement in and for itself rather than as a passive object of external forces. Two labour movement waves have emerged under post Communism, the first an expression of desire for democracy, the second as a collaboration and clientelism. A third wave, against the ravages of neoliberalism, is only just emerging.

The Moslem question in Bosnia-Hercegovina
David Bruce MacDonald

2441Chapter8 16/10/02 8:06 am Page 220 8 ‘Greater Serbia’ and ‘Greater Croatia’: the Moslem question in Bosnia-Hercegovina We live in the borderland between two worlds, on the border between nations, within everybody’s reach, always someone’s scapegoat. Against us the waves of history break, as if against a cliff. (Meša Selimoviš : Dervish and Death)1 I can see that the situation is far more complicated and more difficult than other problems I have seen, even Cambodia. It is the peculiar three-sided nature of the struggle here that makes it so difficult

in Balkan holocausts?
Martin Upchurch and Darko Marinković

3 Serbia in the world economy In this chapter, we examine the problems Serbia has faced within the global world economy in order to contextualise the limits of the aspirations and expectations of the workers’ movement. We have already described the significance of the former Yugoslavia’s debt in engendering inter-republic tensions. This accumulated debt adversely affected Serbia’s ability to stabilise its economy in the post-Miloševič years. Problems of indebtedness remain, and the government’s strategy of privatisation, while achieving some success in its

in Workers and revolution in Serbia
Christine E. Hallett

1 Heroines in Belgium and Serbia Introduction: plucky nurses At the outbreak of the First World War British women volunteered for war service in such numbers that organisations such as the Red Cross and the Order of St John of Jerusalem found themselves, initially, overwhelmed. Many of those who offered to nurse the wounded held no nursing qualifications of any kind, and had to wait until they had passed VAD examinations, or acquired full nurse-training in recognised training hospitals, before they could gain acceptance for military service. American women, too

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
David Bruce MacDonald

2441Chapter4 16/10/02 8:04 am Page 98 4 Croatia, ‘Greater Serbianism’, and the conflict between East and West Christ’s remarkable principle: ‘Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them that use and persecute you.’ That selfless sentiment has remained throughout history a cry of the weak, or an expression of those who have accepted their doom . . . No matter how many examples can be found in life and history to support such renunciation, it has never overcome the passions of hatred and the desire to

in Balkan holocausts?
Timothy Edmunds

After an initially slow start, international security assistance programmes to Serbia-Montenegro have multiplied in their number, scope and ambition since 2000. However, the breadth and depth of their influence has been more limited than in Croatia. While they have helped to influence the normative and technical criteria against which security sector

in Security sector reform in transforming societies
Martin Upchurch and Darko Marinković

6 Serbia’s new period of crisis In this book, we have focused on the life and times of ordinary workers under both Tito and Milošević. We have tracked the developments in the Serbian economy since the October 2000 Revolution and attempted to describe the impact of the ongoing economic difficulties. We have adopted this objective because the revolution against Milošević was at its very core generated by ordinary people who wanted a better future after the years of civil war, nationalism and austerity. The demands of the revolution focused on democracy, freedom

in Workers and revolution in Serbia
Timothy Edmunds

Serbia-Montenegro confronted a formidable series of political level security sector reform challenges in October 2000. The Army, 1 police and intelligence agencies of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRJ) had been deeply politicised under the old regime, while many of their most senior personnel were implicated in war crimes, corruption or organised

in Security sector reform in transforming societies
Timothy Edmunds

The SFRJ and Milošević periods left a number of extremely negative organisational legacies in the Army, police and intelligence agencies in Serbia-Montenegro. These included the maintenance of large, outdated and heavily militarised force structures and human resource management systems; a prioritisation of regime security and sectional institutional

in Security sector reform in transforming societies
James W. Peterson

instance, this was true of American sympathy for Slovenia and Russia’s long-standing support for Serbia. Similarly, the Yugoslav federation was a kind of artifice throughout its history, and it was no surprise that different political patterns or “types” developed within the various states. For example, Slovenia and eventually Croatia adopted democratic patterns, while the Serb-dominated remnant of

in Defending Eastern Europe