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This book presents a biography of the poetics and politics of London in 1613, from Whitehall to Guildhall, that is, Shakespeare's London. It examines major events at court, such as the untimely death of Prince Henry and its aftermath, and the extravagant wedding of Princess Elizabeth to Frederick of Germany and her journey to the Continent. The city flourished with scores of publications on a vast array of topics, including poetry, travel narratives, music, and, of course, plays. The book offers summaries and analyses of most of these texts, knowing that some of them may not be well-known to all readers. Many of these publications had a kind of link to the court. In order to understand the context of the year 1613, the book actually begins in October 1612 with Prince Henry's illness and death in November, which had a major impact on what happened in 1613. It proceeds more or less chronologically from this event to Princess Elizabeth's wedding and the stunning array of dramatic performances at court, and includes the journey to her new home in Germany. As part of the year's cultural nexus, the narrative reaches into the Guildhall experience to explore the riches of the books that emanated from London's printers and to examine specifically the drama performed or published in 1613. The final major focus centres on the Carr-Howard wedding at the year's end, full of cultural activities and ripe with political significance.

Steve Sohmer

(London: 1693), pp. 121–2. 5 Lewis Theobald (ed.), The Workes of Shakespeare, (London: 1733), 7.461. 6 Sam. Johnson and Geo. Steevens (eds), The dramatick writings of Will. Shakspere, etc. (London: 1788), 19

in Shakespeare for the wiser sort
Abstract only
Appropriation, dislocation, and crossmapping
Elisabeth Bronfen

the Nature of Evil’, Vanity Fair , 12 May 2019. 5 Billions , ‘The Punch’, season 1, episode 7, dir. Stephen Gyllenhaal, writ. Brian Koppelman and David Levien, m45.10 (Showtime 2016). 6 See Stephen O’Neill’s ‘Introduction: “Sowed and Scattered”: Shakespeare’s Media Ecologies’ in his edited volume Broadcast Your Shakespeare (London: Bloomsbury, 2018), p. 5. 7 O’Neill, ‘Introduction’, p. 23. 8 Marjorie Garber, Shakespeare After All (New York: Pantheon Books, 2004), p. 28 (italics in original). Laura Estill makes a similar point in her essay

in Serial Shakespeare
Jesús Tronch

.), Titus Andronicus , The Arden Shakespeare ( London and New York : Routledge , 1995 ). Bate , J. and E. Rasmussen (eds), The RSC Shakespeare Complete Works ( Basingstoke and New York : Palgrave Macmillan , 2007 ). Foakes , R. (ed.), King Lear , The Arden Shakespeare ( London : Thomson , 1997 ). Freeman , A

in Doing Kyd
Essex and Ireland
Chris Butler and Willy Maley

. 49 All quotations from Shakespeare, except from As You Like It , are from Stephen Greenblatt, Walter Cohen, Jean E. Howard and Katharine Eisaman Maus (eds), The Norton Shakespeare (London: Norton, 1997). 50 See Alzada J. Tipton, ‘“Lively Patterns … for Affayres of State”: Sir John

in Essex
Pascale Drouet

. 2 Balandier, Le Détour , p. 117; my translation of ‘théâtrocratie’ and ‘dramatisation en tant que ruse spectaculaire’. 3 William Shakespeare, King Richard II , ed. Charles R. Forker, The Arden Shakespeare (London: Thomson Learning, 2002). Italics mine. All the following quotations are taken from this edition

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
Abstract only
Pascale Drouet

, King Henry VI, Part 2 , ed. Ronald Knowles, The Arden Shakespeare (London: Thomson Learning, 2001). 24 Oxford English Dictionary , ‘desolation, n .’, 3; 2. a. 25 Barthes, A Lover’s Discourse , p. 87. In the original text: ‘monde sidéré

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
Pascale Drouet

’existence’. 23 Oxford English Dictionary , ‘counterfeit, v .’, 3. 5. 24 William Shakespeare, King Henry IV , Part 1 , ed. A. R. Humphreys, The Arden Shakespeare (London: Routledge, 1992). 25 William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing , ed. A. R

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
Shakespeare and King James
Neil Rhodes

by Shakespeare (London and New York: Routledge, 1992), pp. 121–40. 18 Geoffrey Bullough ed., Narrative and Dramatic Sources of Shakespeare (London: Routledge, 1962), IV, p. 190. 19 ‘To the People of Scotland’, 22

in Shakespeare and Scotland
Abstract only
Regime change in Macbeth
Richard Wilson

–2. 9 Stephen Greenblatt, Introduction to Macbeth , Norton Edition, ed. Stephen Greenblatt, Walter Cohen, Jean Howard and Katharine Eisaman Maus (New York: Norton, 1997), p. 2561. 10 Anthony Holden, William Shakespeare (London: Little, Brown, 1999), p. 235

in Free Will