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Author: Andrew Teverson

Salman Rushdie is one of the world's most important writers of politicised fiction. He is a self-proclaimed controversialist, capable of exciting radically divergent viewpoints; a novelist of extraordinary imaginative range and power; and an erudite, and often fearless, commentator upon the state of global politics today. This critical study examines the intellectual, biographical, literary and cultural contexts from which Rushdie's fiction springs, in order to help the reader make sense of the often complex debates that surround the life and work of this major contemporary figure. It also offers detailed critical readings of all Rushdie's novels, from Grimus through to Shalimar the Clown.

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Shalimar the Clown
Andrew Teverson

Rushdie’s ninth novel, Shalimar the Clown , was published in 2005 shortly before this book was completed. Although it is impossible to predict the future trajectory of Rushdie’s career, Shalimar suggests a new development to the extent that it fuses the interest in US-led globalisation apparent in the novels of his middle period ( The Ground Beneath Her Feet and Fury ) with the sustained focus on a South Asian national experience apparent in the novels of his early period ( Midnight’s Children and Shame ). In this instance Rushdie

in Salman Rushdie
Andrew Teverson

. Rather than about the fluff in other people’s navels. Or about the fluff in the cosmic navel … 2 The resistance to such perceived political resignation is apparent in almost all of Rushdie’s writing, from his early bile-spewing satires on South Asian political leaders in Midnight’s Children and Shame through his serio-comic eructations of anger at institutionalised racism in the British police force in The Satanic Verses to his interrogations of the global power of the US in The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Fury (2001) and Shalimar the

in Salman Rushdie
Andrew Teverson

States publication of Fury coincided with the September 11 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. This led Rushdie to claim that it was the only novel in the history of writing that had become ‘out of date’ at the same moment it was published, since that event had changed the world about which he was writing. 62 ‘Like every writer in the world’, Rushdie claimed, he is now ‘trying to find a way of writing after 11 September 2001, a day that has become something like a borderline’ (SAL, 436). Rushdie’s ninth novel, Shalimar the Clown (2005), is the first

in Salman Rushdie