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Linnie Blake

-style by asking the most taboo of all questions: whether, in the age of the PATRIOT Act, ‘extraordinary rendition’ and Guantanamo Bay, Americans can continue to claim a national association with the cause of freedom at all. Notes 1 Noam Chomsky, 9/11 (New York: Seven Stories, 2002). 2 These were the 1993 attack on US marines in Mogadishu, the truck bombing in Riadh in 1995, the bombing of the Khobar Towers in Dahran in 1996, the bombing of US Embassies in East Africa in 1998 and the attack on the USS Cole in 2000. 3 Slavojiek, ‘Are we in a war? Do we have an enemy

in The wounds of nations
Scott Wilson

that are both directed by and towards goals of efficiency (Lyotard, 1993: 147). While it is difficult to imagine a direct alliance between the anti-federalist, anti-corporate antisemitism of the US white suprematicist and survivalist movements and the anti-Jewish and anti-American force of extremist Islam, there are nevertheless signs that a strange schizoid alliance might be emerging. In November 1999, as Slavoji•ek comments, ‘a strange thing took place in New York politics … Lenora Fulani, the Black activist from Harlem endorsed Patrick Buchanan’s Reform Party

in Great Satan’s rage
Post-war national identity and the spirit of subaltern vengeance in Ringu and The Ring
Linnie Blake

Japanese characters, crawling damaged people, a pointing man, the character ‘sada’ reflected in a human eye, the corona of light peeping around the partially closed cover of a well. But because she illustrates the ways in which dominant ideologies assign a state of psychotic meaninglessness to the unheard and unrecognised who, because they are considered incomprehensible, are excluded from the material world, Sadako’s video can also be seen to propose a new way of reconceiving and reconfiguring both the subject and his or her society. For as Slavojiek (following Marx

in The wounds of nations