Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,068 items for :

  • "Social Media" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson
and
Emma Weitkamp

social media for research communication. We define social media as those internet-based tools and platforms that allow individuals to create content, some of which also facilitate conversations and networking between individuals. Social media offer the potential of many-to-many communication, though in practice we also see both few-to-many (for example high-profile Twitter or YouTube accounts that have many followers) and few-to-few (for example, some LinkedIn Groups have only a few hundred members, but many of these members post regularly and comment on each other

in Creative research communication
Barrie Gunter

5 Branding potential of online social media When it comes to eating Nestle’s Polo Mints, do you suck them or crunch them? On a website created by the company, visitors are invited to click on whether they see themselves as one type or the other (www.polomint.co.uk). They are then directed to join fellow ‘Suckers’ or ‘Crunchers’ on a social media site. These two types of fans of the brand could then exchange brand experiences with each other. The Wrigley’s Extra website (www.wrigleys.com/uk/brands/extra.aspx) provides access to a social media community in which

in Kids and branding in a digital world
Paul Reilly

This book examines the ways in which contentious parades and protests in ‘post-conflict’ Northern Ireland are contested by affective publics mobilised on social media. In this way, it will contribute to the extant interdisciplinary scholarship on digital citizenship and the role of digital media in contemporary social movements. This chapter contextualises the research findings presented throughout this book by exploring three key issues. First, it introduces the contentious politics framework and applies it to the Northern Irish conflict. Second, it explores

in Digital contention in a divided society
Mark Doidge
,
Radosław Kossakowski
, and
Svenja Mintert

96 Ultras 4 Social media as a space of continuous performance Throughout the season fans everywhere are filled with excitement and anticipation as their teams battle and compete for glory and to avoid disappointment. The success and failure of football clubs becomes a symbolic representation of individuals, cities, regions and nations across the globe. Yet the competition is not limited to what takes place on the field. For ultras, status and solidarity is reflected in their spectacular choreographies, and the new season provides more opportunities for

in Ultras
Kirsten Forkert
,
Federico Oliveri
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
, and
Janna Graham

3 Social media, mutual aid and solidarity movements as a response to institutional breakdown Introduction Earlier in this book, we discussed media coverage of wars, and international relations more generally, and how this produces a sense of helplessness, confusion and general distrust for media audiences. Information about global conflicts seems inadequate, biased, and does not give people enough of a conceptual framework to understand or respond. This is connected to a sense that international and national governments are failing to deal with global conflicts

in How media and conflicts make migrants
Regina E. Rauxloh

69 4 Regina E. Rauxloh ‘Kony is so last month’ –​lessons from social media stunt ‘Kony 2012’ Introduction The role of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is to bring those responsible for committing the most serious crimes to justice when no domestic court is willing or able to do so. Although as of 2015, the Court has as many as 123 member states, one of its most crippling weaknesses is its lack of enforcement power.1 The ICC is entirely dependent on the co-​operation of national states, whether it is for enabling investigation by permitting entry into a

in Law in popular belief
Sean Healy
and
Victoria Russell

-immigrant fringes, was bolstered by the statements of the European border control agency Frontex, caught fire on social media, was then repeated by major media outlets, politicians and prosecutors, and eventually became policy of the then-government of Italy, under Interior Minister Matteo Salvini. It achieved its moment of (temporary) victory in 2018 with the closing of Italian ports to NGO vessels and the halting of search and rescue operations by NGOs on the Mediterranean. The

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Four Conversations with Canadian Communications Officers
Dominique Marshall

, and the increasing flux of digital content. Rosenberg, Danielski, and Falconer were initially journalists in printed newspapers. The publication for which Falconer worked, for instance, progressed towards online reporting; when she left to write freelance assignments for non-profit organizations, she soon found herself writing for digital platforms, composing blogs and Facebook posts. Six years ago, when the CRC offered her a permanent position, she welcomed the opportunity to further this experience with social media in a stable and innovative environment

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Justin A. Joyce

Recalling the insurrectionary violence that descended upon the US Capitol on 6 January 2021, reflecting on the baser instincts left unchecked in America by an absence of common communication and a paradigmatic shift in our media apparatuses, Justin A. Joyce introduces the seventh volume of James Baldwin Review.

James Baldwin Review
Megan Daigle
,
Sarah Martin
, and
Henri Myrttinen

international colleagues. This, we argue, is all the more striking in light of the 2018 Oxfam scandal and resurgence of interest in preventing sexual exploitation and abuse (see GADN, 2019 ), as well as the rise of #AidToo and #AidSoWhite which saw aid workers share experiences of sexual violence and racism on social media as part of wider #MeToo and #BlackLivesMatter phenomena since 2013. 3 While the term ‘the field’ – and its more extreme sibling ‘the deep field

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs