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Practice and policy lessons from Northern Ireland and the Border Counties
Author: Sandra Buchanan

Transforming Conflict examines lessons learned from the Northern Ireland and Border Counties conflict transformation process through social and economic development and their consequent impacts and implications for practice and policymaking, with a range of functional recommendations produced for other regions emerging from and seeking to transform violent conflict. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive assessment of the region’s transformation activity, largely amongst grassroots actors, enabled by a number of specific funding programmes, namely the International Fund for Ireland, Peace I and II and INTERREG I, II and IIIA. These programmes have facilitated conflict transformation over more than two decades, presenting a case ripe for lesson sharing. In focusing on the politics of the socioeconomic activities that underpinned the elite negotiations of the peace process, key theoretical transformation concepts are firstly explored, followed by an examination of the social and economic context of Northern Ireland and the Border Counties. The three programmes and their impacts are then assessed before considering what policy lessons can be learned and what recommendations can be made for practice. This is underpinned by a range of semi-structured interviews and the author’s own experience as a project promoter through these programmes in the Border Counties for more than a decade.

Sandra Buchanan

Having discussed the difficulties associated with the role of social and economic development in transforming conflict, assessing the conflict driver role of social and economic development and the effects of conflict on such development presents its own difficulties. Despite the domination of an elite-level political discourse, there is no

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Abstract only
Sandra Buchanan

INTERREG I, II and III programmes, since 1991. All have facilitated the conflict transformation process in the region specifically through social and economic development. 1 Collectively, having contributed over €3.25 billion to the process, they have been responsible for a huge increase in transformation practice, particularly at the grassroots level, prompting previously unforeseen levels of citizen empowerment and

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Sandra Buchanan

However, such efforts exist and are viable. In the Northern Ireland context, a number of external funding support programmes have concentrated their efforts on supporting the peace process since the mid 1980s through social and economic development, under the guise of the International Fund for Ireland (IFI) and the EU Peace Programmes (Peace I, II, and III), having contributed billions of euros to the region’s conflict t­ ransformation process. These programmes provide a case study for assessing the efforts of external funding of peace processes as they prompted

in Theories of International Relations and Northern Ireland
Abstract only
Sandra Buchanan

This book has highlighted the vastness and complexity of the conflict transformation field. While the Northern Ireland conflict is one of the most heavily researched conflicts in the world, research focusing on its conflict transformation process, particularly through social and economic development, is not readily available. Specifically, no attempt has

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Louise Fuller

latter report, the dominant purpose of schooling was seen as the ‘inculcation of religious ideals and values’ and ‘the preservation and transmission’ of the cultural heritage.15 As regards the Irish language, by the 1960s it was obvious that the aim of restoring Irish as the first language was not viable and the schools-based revival policy was discredited.16 However there were also more urgent practical educational issues to be faced. In the post-war era Ireland lagged behind Britain, America and mainland Europe in terms of social and economic development. The country

in Irish Catholic identities
Stephen Emerson and Hussein Solomon

means that empower people and societies through political, social, and economic development and build long-term security for all. The changing (and changeless) face of engagement Foreign powers, international organizations, and individuals have been drawn to Africa for centuries. From the colonial period to independence and throughout the Cold War and beyond, external actors have been instrumental in defining not only the nature of African security, but also in determining the continent’s security agenda. Security during the colonial period, as we have seen, was

in African security in the twenty-first century
Sandra Buchanan

In view of the theoretical confusion and associated definitional morass surrounding conflict transformation, it is necessary to preface this book with some conceptual clarification. This will enable an appropriate assessment of conflict transformation through social and economic development, specifically through the impacts of the tools under consideration

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Abstract only
Joseph M. Hodge and Gerald Hödl

FIDES expected colonial states to match metropolitan funding at a rate of 45 per cent. 71 Nevertheless, for the first time, both the British and French metropolitan governments were prepared to provide substantial subventions of metropolitan funds and resources to undertake programmes of social and economic development in Africa, not only to build infrastructure and make economic production more efficient, but

in Developing Africa
Arthur B. Gunlicks

as a deep-seated political change comparable to the administrative transformations in Prussia after 1870. Rather, they took the form of adjustments of the administrative organization to long-ignored changes in social and economic developments.8 Today the sixteen Länder are divided between thirteen territorial states (Flächenstaaten) and three city states (by size of population: Berlin, Hamburg, and Bremen). There are four large territorial states (by size of population: North-Rhine Westphalia, Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg, and Lower Saxony), eight medium-sized states

in The Länder and German federalism