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Memory and mortality at the bombsite

Death is simultaneously silent, and very loud, in political life. Politicians and media scream about potential threats lurking behind every corner, but academic discourse often neglects mortality. Life is everywhere in theorisation of security, but death is nowhere.

Making a bold intervention into the Critical Security Studies literature, this book explores the ontological relationship between mortality and security after the Death of God – arguing that security emerged in response to the removal of promises to immortal salvation. Combining the mortality theories of Heidegger and Bauman with literature from the sociology of death, Heath-Kelly shows how security is a response to the death anxiety implicit within the human condition.

The book explores the theoretical literature on mortality before undertaking a comparative exploration of the memorialisation of four prominent post-terrorist sites: the World Trade Center in New York, the Bali bombsite, the London bombings and the Norwegian sites attacked by Anders Breivik. By interviewing the architects and designers of these reconstruction projects, Heath-Kelly shows that practices of memorialization are a retrospective security endeavour – they conceal and re-narrate the traumatic incursion of death. Disaster recovery is replete with security practices that return mortality to its sublimated position and remove the disruption posed by mortality to political authority.

The book will be of significant interest to academics and postgraduates working in the fields of Critical Security Studies, Memory Studies and International Politics.

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Death and security – the only two certainties
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

permanent, consistent and objective. As such, these philosophers argue that mortality drives the development of cultural and political techniques that efface the inevitability of death by performing stability and permanent meaning. I develop this philosophical trajectory here by reading security practice as sociology of death. Security, and the state that deploys it, are responsive to the aporia of

in Death and security
Disaster management
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

Having Outlined a theoretical conception of security (in both prophylactic and resilient forms) as the effacement of mortality, the rest of this book explores security practices to test the reading. Do they mitigate mortality? In particular, the book interrogates non-anticipatory practices of security. It argues that by reading security as sociology of death, one can

in Death and security
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

sociology of death in the era of resilience, where ‘death’ is supposedly brought inside the security paradigm as unpreventable danger? I will argue here that nothing significant has changed since previous eras of security. Security still effaces the prospect of mortality; however, resilience is somewhat more sophisticated in its means. Bauman’s exploration of the shift in mortality

in Death and security
Theorising cemeteries
Julie Rugg

contemporary presence and absence of death’ in Clark, D. (ed.), The Sociology of Death: Theory, Culture and Practice (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1993), p. 17. 20 Foucault, ‘Different spaces’, p. 6. 21 Laqueur, ‘Cemeteries, religion and the culture of capitalism’. 22 J. Roach, Cities of the Dead: Circum-Atlantic Performance (New York: Columbia University Press, 1996), p. 48. 23 Michel Ragon, The Space of Death: A Study in Funerary Architecture, Decoration and Urbanism, trans. A. Sheridan (Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia, 1983), p. 16. 24 Foucault

in Churchyard and cemetery