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Art and destruction

Solvent form examines the destruction of art—through objects that have been destroyed (lost in fires, floods, vandalism, or similarly those artists that actively court or represent this destruction, such as Gustav Metzger), but also as a process within art that the object courts through form. In this manner, Solvent form looks to events such as the Momart warehouse fire in 2004 as well as the actions of art thief Stéphane Breitwieser in which the stolen work was destroyed. Against this overlay, a tendency is mapped whereby individuals attempt to conceptually gather these destroyed or lost objects, to somehow recoup in their absence. From this vantage, Solvent form—hinging on the dual meaning in the words solvent and solvency—proposes an idea of art as an attempt to secure and fix, which correspondingly undoes and destroys through its inception. It also weaves a narrative of art that intermingles with Jean Baudrillard’s ideas on disappearance, Georges Bataille and Paul Virilio’s negative or reverse miracle, Jean-Luc Nancy’s concept of the image (or imago as votive that keeps present the past, yet also burns), and Giorgio Agamben’s notion of art as an attempt to make the moment appear permeable. Likewise, it is through these destructions that one might distinguish a solvency within art and catch an operation in which something is made visible through these moments of destruction when art’s metaphorical undoing emerges as oddly literal.

Jared Pappas-Kelley

endlessly recapture this moment that counts as if “we were trying to arrest the moment and freeze it in the constantly renewed gasps of our laughter or our sobs.”60 Art is an attempt to touch this moment of rupture to make it permeable in a primary sense, this accident: of technology, of death, of war (to which Damage Control responds)—but also an accident of beauty, an accident of intimacy. Moreover, because there does not exist any clever wordplay as a solvency for this precise “artwreck,” we must instead refer to these activities as shipwreck or more simply by the

in Solvent form
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James Whidden

A central project of the colonial administration was financial, reordering Egypt's finances from bankruptcy to solvency. That project was built upon the export of cotton. Therefore, agricultural and hydraulic works were crucial to the imperial mission and a central theme in Milner's England in Egypt . The greatest of the hydraulic projects was the Aswan Dam, planning for which was undertaken by

in Egypt
Brett Bowles

Despite their mutually lucrative partnership in making Marius , Pagnol ran afoul of Paramount over the adaptation of Topaze in early 1932 as the worsening of the Great Depression threatened the solvency of the Joinville complex and made reducing expenses more imperative than ever for the American juggernaut. In a directive sent to Paris in April 1932, Paramount founder Jesse Lasky acknowledged

in Marcel Pagnol
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Jared Pappas-Kelley

3 Solvent form Trying to make the moment permeable, the art impulse yields forms that are likewise solvent. It is this intersection of permeability that the destroyed object prompts most overtly. Crossing an expansive moment when form is most solvent, to be here and yet not, solvent in terms of capable of undoing (dissolving) yet also in the sense of solvency, to make secure and firm. Therefore, in this an art object points to itself, as well as to what is imperceptible and distinct, ensnaring us both in the cascading of the moment and in prolonging this

in Solvent form
Prisoners of the past
Author: Richard Jobson

This book examines the impact that nostalgia has had on the Labour Party’s political development since 1951. In contrast to existing studies that have emphasised the role played by modernity, it argues that nostalgia has defined Labour’s identity and determined the party’s trajectory over time. It outlines how Labour, at both an elite and a grassroots level, has been and remains heavily influenced by a nostalgic commitment to an era of heroic male industrial working-class struggle. This commitment has hindered policy discussion, determined the form that the modernisation process has taken and shaped internal conflict and cohesion. More broadly, Labour’s emotional attachment to the past has made it difficult for the party to adjust to the socioeconomic changes that have taken place in Britain. In short, nostalgia has frequently left the party out of touch with the modern world. In this way, this book offers an assessment of Labour’s failures to adapt to the changing nature and demands of post-war Britain.

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Costas Simitis

be restructured, not kept alive by taxpayers on their own.’6 However, in the countries of the European Periphery, there was intense criticism of this analysis. They felt that this principle would be applied by Germany and its allies only to nations of the Periphery, not members of the Core. The ECB had to enforce rules on the basis of uniform regulations; banking supervision and a banking union were to be realised as soon as possible. Greece.indb 298 3/13/2014 1:56:52 PM Cyprus 299 The ‘value of … bank liabilities depends on the solvency of the government

in The European debt crisis
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Jared Pappas-Kelley

friction, confrontation, even destruction – but also, always with creativity. Resistance is conflict between creativity and destruction.”16 Thus we find the site of art, this point of resistance between creativity and destruction, where its solvency dwells. It is in this action of giving form as “an envelope”17 for making it tangible. Hirschhorn notes, “I’m thinking of a skin, a shell or a geode.”18 Thus these things become a skin in which art might dwell beside a resistance to what it fixes. However, if art resides as thing, enclosed in climate-controlled environments

in Solvent form
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Sarah-Anne Buckley

concerns over State interference in the family. For the State, the reluctance to tackle the social or economic problems facing families in poverty, not to mention the underlying causes, is sharply contrasted with its concerns about sexuality and financial solvency. While various scholars have addressed the effects of draconian policies introduced by the State from the 1920s to the 1940s, the distress that families endured as a result of those policies deserves greater attention. This book has hopefully provided a glimpse into the situations for single mothers, widowers

in The cruelty man
An obstacle race
Costas Simitis

grant new loans to ensure the continued solvency of their debtor, the first thing they do is extend the repayment schedule of the existing debt. The matter was over-stressed by the Greek government in an effort to present this as a success. It would have been more advisable for it to direct its efforts toward a discussion of the effects of the recession and a revision of other conditions of the loan; such a debate could have prompted a recognition of the impossibility of reducing the annual budget deficit to 3% of GDP over a period of three years. Cautious optimism

in The European debt crisis