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Music, radicalism and reform in the Anglophone world, 1790–1914

Throughout the long nineteenth-century the sounds of liberty resonated across the Anglophone world. Focusing on radicals and reformers committed to the struggle for a better future, this book explores the role of music in the transmission of political culture over time and distance. The book examines iconic songs; the sound of music as radicals and reformers were marching, electioneering, celebrating, commemorating as well as striking, rioting and rebelling. Following the footsteps of relentlessly travelling activists, it brings to light the importance of music-making in the lived experience of politics. The book argues that music and music-making are highly effective lens for investigating the inter-colonial and transnational history of radicalism and reform between 1790 and 1914. It offers glimpses of indigenous agency, appropriation, adaptation and resistance by those who used the musical culture of the white colonisers. Hymn-singing was an intrinsic part of life in Victorian Britain and her colonies and those hymns are often associated with conservatism, if not reaction. The book highlights how music encouraged, unified, divided, consoled, reminded, inspired and, at times, oppressed, providing an opportunity to hear history as it happened. The examples presented show that music was dialogic – mediating the relationship between leader and led; revealing the ways that song moved in and out of daily exchange, the way it encouraged, unified, attacked, divided, consoled, and constructed. The study provides a wealth of evidence to suggest that the edifice of 'Australian exceptionalism', as it applies to radicals and reformers, is crumbling.

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Don Fairservice

Experiments It comes as something of a surprise to discover that the first successful attempts to marry sound with pictures are alleged to have occurred as early as 1889 when Thomas Edison’s young laboratory assistant W. K. L. Dickson is supposed to have presented Edison with a projected image on a screen, roughly synchronised with sound. In actual fact no evidence of Dickson’s claim exists; if Dickson

in Film editing: history, theory and practice
Open Access (free)
Henry David Thoreau
David Herd

1 Sounding: Henry David Thoreau We know what Thoreau meant by Walden, or at least, we know what he meant for it to do. We know because he told us, on the title page of his book, where by way of an epigraph he quoted himself: I do not propose to write an ode to dejection, but to brag as lustily as chanticleer in the morning, standing on his roost, if only to wake my neighbors up.1 So that’s clear then. In fact, Thoreau could be hardly be clearer. What could be clearer after all, as he amplifies later in the chapter called ‘Sounds’, than a cockerel crowing clear

in Enthusiast!
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Andy Birtwistle

◂◂ Back to the future II 1935, 1937, 1940 The model of sound–image relations proposed by Eisenstein, Pudovkin and Alexandrov in The Sound Film: A Statement from the USSR (1928) was formulated as a reaction to the introduction of synchronous sound – a post-hoc theorisation offered in response to the

in Cinesonica
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Andy Birtwistle

Like the sounds of ground noise and optical crackle discussed in the previous chapter, electronic sounds have also been figured as noise. In part, electronica has been framed in this way because of its status as a strange sound. As the cultural theorist Jacques Attali states in his seminal work on noise, ‘In music, the instrument often predates the expression it authorises, which explains why a new

in Cinesonica
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Immigration and music in Cosas que dejé en La Habana
Isabel Santaolalla

‘No digas todo eso sin música, Diego.’ (‘Don’t say all that without music, Diego’) Nancy (Mirtha Ibarra) to Diego (Jorge Perugorría) in Fresa y chocolate (Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, 1993) Like all forms of sound, music is – in John Connell

in Screening songs in Hispanic and Lusophone cinema
Andy Birtwistle

Ground noise and optical crackle: the sound of film There are a number of important cinesonic elements that escape the traditional tripartite division of the film soundtrack into speech, music and effects: one is noise, another silence and the third the sound of the technology of film itself. This last

in Cinesonica
Catherine Laws

10 Beckett and unheard sound Catherine Laws The prospect of silence Beckett’s work has often been perceived as pushing towards its own obliteration, ever closer to the silencing of the voice. His ‘characters’ – though hardly that – with decaying, almost useless bodies, situated in barren environments, steadily insist that there is nothing to say and no possibility of knowledge or understanding, while (and by) fizzling on with their increasingly broken, empty, repetitive, hopeless – and often very funny – narratives of their very attempts to tell meaningful

in Beckett and nothing
Roger Singleton-Turner

A film or TV programme can be broken down to three components: content, pictures and sound. One Sound Supervisor said to me, with good reason, ‘If it sounds right, it’ll look right!’ Sound is an element of any moving image project that will repay the effort spent on it. It’s true that pictures came before sound in the early days of film, but, even then, no movie was complete without a piano or other musical accompaniment; some performances even merited a full orchestral score. The impact of a film with no sound and no such musical accompaniment was

in Cue and Cut
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Andy Birtwistle

Listening ears Scattered along the British coastline are the crumbling remains of a sound technology that never really was. Between the First and Second World Wars a series of experimental concrete sound mirrors was constructed to serve as an early warning system against airborne attack from mainland

in Cinesonica