This book explores the place of memory in post-apartheid South Africa by analysing state sanctioned-performances of the nation. It first explores how the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) archive was created, and what it means to contemporary South Africa. The book then explores creative responses to the TRC. It examines individual narratives that have become iconic; asking why these have been chosen to represent the experiences of the broader majority. It analyses how contemporary cultural practitioners are particularly exploring various non-realistic, highly performative forms in conjunction with verbatim narratives to reflect on diverse lived realities in South Africa. The inherited apartheid archives embody particular narratives of South Africa, especially those that defined separate cultural identities, with their relative worth and histories. The way these archives of memory were constructed and controlled is important, especially insofar as they affected the social structure of the nation, beyond apartheid legislation. The book looks at how at moments of political crisis or transition, specific narratives of history, from particular cultural perspectives, have been performed in public spaces to define national identities. It also explores how Mbeki used the South Africa-Mali project, within the context of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) to extend the imagined boundaries of the nation. Finally, the book explores contemporary popular performance and theatrical engagements with history and memory.

Editor: Donal Lowry

The neo-classical troopers' memorial of New Zealand, together with others around the former British Empire, illustrates the manner in which the South African War became a major imperial. This book explores how South Africa is negotiating its past in and through various modes of performance in contemporary theatre, public events and memorial spaces. Opinion on the war was as divided among white Afrikaners, Africans, 'Coloureds' and English-speaking white South Africans as these communities were from each other. The book analyses the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) as a live event and as an archive asking throughout how the TRC has affected the definition of identity and memory in contemporary South Africa, including disavowed memories. It surveys a century of controversy surrounding the origins of the war and in particular the argument that gold shaped British policy towards the Transvaal in the drift towards war. The remarkable South African career of Flora Shaw, the first woman to gain a professional position on The Times, is portrayed in the book. The book also examines the expensive operation mounted by The Times in order to cover the war. While acknowledging the need not to overstress the role of personality, the book echoes J. A. S. Grenville in describing the combination of Milner and Chamberlain as a 'fateful partnership'. Current renegotiations of popular repertoires, particularly songs and dances related to the struggle, revivals of classic European and South African protest plays, new history plays and specific racial and ethnic histories and identities, are analysed.

Ethnicity, identity, gender and race, 1772–1914

This book is a full-length study of the role of the Scots from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. It highlights the interaction of Scots with African peoples, the manner in which missions and schools were credited with producing ‘Black Scotsmen’ and the ways in which they pursued many distinctive policies. The book also deals with the inter-weaving of issues of gender, class and race, as well as with the means by which Scots clung to their ethnicity through founding various social and cultural societies. It contributes to both Scottish and South African history, and, in the process, illuminates a significant field of the Scottish Diaspora that has so far received little attention.

Christopher Saunders

By the mid-1890s the long process of bringing what is now South Africa under white rule was all but complete. Britain had played a central role in that process: from 1811 to 1879 the British army had fought and defeated one African chiefdom after another. Yet despite the enormous suffering which Africans had endured as a consequence of British actions

in The South African War reappraised
Mordechai Tamarkin

This chapter seeks to examine the role of the Cape, and the Cape Afrikaners in particular, in the historical trajectory which led South Africa and Britain from the Jameson Raid to the South African War. There was a large measure of political convergence between the Cape Colony and the Cape Afrikaners. Since 1884 the Afrikaner Bond, the party representing

in The South African War reappraised
Abstract only
Christopher Merrett and John Nauright

In the study of the transfer of imperial cultural forms, South Africa provides one of the most fascinating case studies. In many respects, South Africa encompassed the full range of social, cultural, political, gender and racial problems which existed throughout the British empire. Distinct cultural groups had emerged by the late nineteenth century to include two groups of

in The imperial game
Open Access (free)
Saving the White voters from being ‘utterly swamped’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

For the first seventy years of the nineteenth century, British governments had been reluctant to extend their involvement in South Africa beyond the coastal colonies of the Cape and Natal. By the 1870s, however, important economic and political developments in South Africa prompted Britain to act in consolidating its interests throughout the Southern African region. These developments

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Abstract only
The South African Museum, Cape Town
John M. MacKenzie

Few museums have passed through as many political changes and cultural transformations as those in South Africa. For 170 years, between the 1820s and the 1990s, they represented white dominance in a blackmajority country. Between the 1950s and the 1990s some of them were partly forced into a new ideological mould by the apartheid Nationalist government, which infiltrated boards of

in Museums and empire
Open Access (free)
Better ‘the Hottentot at the hustings’ than ‘the Hottentot in the wilds with his gun on his shoulder’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

conquest and formal cession by treaty; the colonial annexations of Xhosa land were similarly based on both military conquest and cession by treaties following the various frontier wars. In South Africa, as elsewhere in the settler colonies, the nineteenth century was characterised by the transfer of Indigenous land to Europeans. Although the process was complex and varied, Indigenous land was eventually

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Abstract only
The Albany Museum, Grahamstown
John M. MacKenzie

solely to their professional interests was impractical. The second meeting of the society heard a paper on fossils by Andrew Geddes Bain, the surveyor and geologist, while at the third it was resolved that papers should be given on the ‘physical characteristics, manners and customs of the native tribes of South Africa, as well as on the geology of the Grahamstown area and on natural history’. By

in Museums and empire