A generation ago, Spain was emerging from a nearly forty-year dictatorship. This book analyses the significant changes in the aesthetics, production and reception of Spanish cinema and genre from 1990 to the present. It brings together European and North American scholars to establish a critical dialogue on the topic of contemporary Spanish cinema and genre while providing multiple perspectives on the concepts of national cinemas and genre theory. The book addresses a particular production unit, the Barcelona-based Fantastic Factory as part of the increasingly important Filmax group of companies, with the explicit aim of making genre films that would have an appeal beyond the Spanish market. It explores the genrification of the Almodovar brand in the US media and cinematic imaginary as a point of departure to tackle how the concepts of genre, authorship and Spanish cinema itself acquire different meanings when transposed into a foreign film market. Melodrama and political thriller films have been a narrative and representational form tied to the imagining of the nation. The book also examines some of the aspects of Carícies that distinguish it from Pons's other entries in his Minimalist Trilogy. It looks briefly at the ways in which the letter acts as one of the central melodramatic gestures in Isabel Coixet's films. After an analysis of the Spanish musical from the 1990s until today, the book discusses Spanish immigration films and some Spanish-Cuban co-productions on tourism and transnational romance.

Hollywood codes and the site of memory in the contemporary film musical
Pietsie Feenstra

The film musical has a long-established tradition in Spain. Since the 1980s, the genre has undergone a revival that explicitly incorporated Spanish musical traditions from previous decades and, at the same time functioning within a process of historical inscription, attached them to a wider cinematic memory. Despite the fact that the Spanish musical incorporates other

in Contemporary Spanish cinema and genre
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Jay Beck and Vicente Rodriguez Ortega

‘immigration film’, the mediation between Cuban and Spanish social and cultural imaginaries and the cross-fertilisation between Hollywood and Spanish musical productions, the authors explore how genre mediates change in Spanish society as it enters its most radical cultural shift in recent history. In the wake of eight years of PP rule under José María Aznar, there has been a marked shift in Spanish media

in Contemporary Spanish cinema and genre
Imperio Argentina and Penélope Cruz as Nazi Germany’s exotic Other
Ann Davies

As a result of her success as a singer, and subsequently as a leading actress in Spanish folkloric films of the 1930s and 1940s, Imperio Argentina became a grande dame of Spanish cinema. She was noted particularly for a film career that emphasised her singing talents, given that the genre of folkloric film was a form of Spanish musical, often centring on the romance between a lower-class Spanish woman

in Screening songs in Hispanic and Lusophone cinema
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Lisa Shaw and Rob Stone

type of film that, in spite of the efforts of highbrow critics to promote a national cinema of cultural value and prestige that promotes Spanish culture abroad, connects only with domestic audiences by continuing the popular and populist Spanish genre of the musical comedy. By exploring connections to earlier traditions of this genre (that does not travel well except to Latin America), Triana Toribio examines this film’s links with the Spanish

in Screening songs in Hispanic and Lusophone cinema
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Music, iteration and translation in La leyenda del tiempo
Parvati Nair

– the conscious repetition of palos (or musical forms) and the effort to emulate the great ‘forefathers’ of the art, Antonio Mairena being a key figure. In this way, traditions could be preserved. Camarón’s La leyenda del tiempo sought out hybridisation with other non-Spanish musical forms in a creative, yet rebellious, enterprise. The success of this album was both national and international. Camarón thus became a pioneer

in Screening songs in Hispanic and Lusophone cinema
Popular genre film in post-Franco Spain
Barry Jordan and Rikki Morgan-Tamosunas

well as international/global problems. The musical Alongside the comedy, the musical film has been one of Spain’s most consistently popular domestic genres. The golden age of the Spanish musical was undoubtedly the 1930s and 1940s, during which companies such as Cifesa produced numerous so-called españoladas . These were hybrid products, a mixture of comedy

in Contemporary Spanish cinema
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Transgender performance and the national imaginary in the Spanish cinema of the democratic era
Ian Biddle and Santiago Fouz-Hernández

). 5 Recent legal changes in Spain are also an important factor to take into account when reading from a post-2006 perspective, as noted by Feenstra in her study of the Spanish musical ( 2008 : 251). 6 The siguiriya is a style of flamenco cante jondo (deep song), which is characterised by its slow, melismatic and melancholy style of

in Screening songs in Hispanic and Lusophone cinema
Historical cinema in post-Franco Spain
Barry Jordan and Rikki Morgan-Tamosunas

of the Pantoja character Ana Montes’s TV performance, to the première of the retrospective Spanish musical film she and her gambling, drug- addict husband, Jorge Olmedo (José Coronado) have just completed - a self-conscious homage to the CIFESA musicals of the thirties and forties. The film is introduced by real-life TV show host Carlos Herrera, thus signalling the blurring of the boundaries between

in Contemporary Spanish cinema
José Álvarez-Junco

favor de la ópera nacional’, Bretón tried to convince other writers to use the Castilian language, ‘as beautiful, simple and rich for singing as any other’ (as ‘its wonderful literature’ proved). In spite of all these declarations and good intentions, a highflying national opera still failed to emerge. Song was yet another sphere in which a creative identity was sought. The main theorist and advocate was the Catalan Felipe Pedrell, who published a Cancionero musical popular español (Popular Spanish Musical Songbook) and the album Noches de España, the very titles of

in Spanish identity in the age of nations