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St Francis Xavier and the politics of ritual in Portuguese India
Author: Pamila Gupta

This book is a study of the complex nature of colonial and missionary power in Portuguese India. Written as a historical ethnography, it explores the evolving shape of a series of Catholic festivals that took place in Goa throughout the duration of Portuguese colonial rule in India (1510-1961), and for which the centrepiece was the “incorrupt” corpse of São Francisco Xavier, a (Spanish Basque) Jesuit missionary (1506–1552)-turned-saint (1622). Using distinct genres of source materials produced over the long duree of Portuguese colonialism in India (Xaverian biographies, European travelogues, royal decrees and Jesuit letters, a state commissioned book dedicated to Xavier, Goa guidebooks, newspaper articles, and medical reports), the book documents the historical and visual transformation of Xavier’s corporeal ritualization in death from a small-scale religious feast arranged by Jesuit missionaries (1554), into an elaborate celebration of Xavier’s canonization organized jointly by church and state (1624), and finally, into a series of “Solemn Expositions” designed by colonial officials at regular centenary intervals (1782, 1859, 1952), including the last colonial exposition of 1961 staged amidst Goa’s liberation and integration into postcolonial India. These six ritual “events”, staged at critical junctures (1554, 1624, 1782, 1859, 1952, 1961), and always centered on Xavier’s biography and corpse, provide the conceptual framework for individual chapters of the book.

Pamila Gupta

the relic of St Francis Xavier. To disprove the impious rumors, to soothe the embittered people, and comply with their spontaneous requests, the ecclesiastical and civic authorities felt obliged to promote the first public exposition of the relics from [the] 10th to 12th February 1782. – Father Caetano Cruz, Chairman for the Diocesan Committee for the

in The relic state
Pamila Gupta

the face of Hindustan. – Dr Lohia, Goan Freedom Fighter, 1946 2 In December 1952 ceremonies took place in a multitude of cities to commemorate 3 the death of St Francis Xavier exactly four hundred years earlier on the island of Sancian (China). These celebrations took place in Pamplona (Spain) – his place of birth; Vatican City (Italy

in The relic state
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Xavier and the Portuguese colonial legacy
Pamila Gupta

once that India has two most beautiful mausoleums – the Taj Mahal at Agra and (on a smaller scale) the silver casket of St Francis Xavier in Goa – P. Rayanna, S.J., 1982 2 In December 2004 government officials in Goa staged the sixteenth exposition of the ‘sacred remains’ of St Francis Xavier. While it took place amidst a

in The relic state
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Pamila Gupta

of day. The places usually visited are the See Primacial [Cathedral], the nunnery of Santa Monaca, and the churches of St Francis, St. Caetano, and Bom Jesus. The latter contains the magnificent tomb of St Francis Xavier. His saintship, however, is no longer displayed to reverential gazers in mummy or ‘scalded pig’ form. Altogether we reckoned about

in The relic state
Abstract only
Pamila Gupta

historical actors but to offer the necessary contextual backdrop for making sense of Xavier’s various ‘translations’ in death in later sections. 6 Figure 3 Souvenir of the Exposition of 1952 of the body of St Francis Xavier In the

in The relic state
Abstract only
Pamila Gupta

thought necessary for the praise and glory of God and for the welfare of souls. – Roberto Nobili, Jesuit priest, c. 1613 39 Sebastião Barreto and Pietro Della Valle: (eye)witness testimonies The seeds of the festival that was organized in 1624 to celebrate the canonization of St Francis Xavier had been planted earlier in the form

in The relic state
Community engagement and lifelong learning
Author: Peter Mayo

In this broad sweep, Mayo explores dominant European discourses of higher education, in the contexts of different globalisations and neoliberalism, and examines its extension to a specific region. It explores alternatives in thinking and practice including those at the grassroots, also providing a situationally grounded project of university–community engagement. Signposts for further directions for higher education lifelong learning, with a social justice purpose, are provided.

Fintan Cullen

Murray, Illustrated Summary Catalogue of the Crawford Municipal Art Gallery, Cork, City of Cork Vocational Education Committee, 1991. 35 An example is the painting St Francis-Xavier Preaching in Japan, by Bernardo Celantano (1860), in the Jesuit church, Gardiner Street, Dublin, illustrated in Maureen Ryan

in Cultural identities and the aesthetics of Britishness
Alana Harris

make clear Father Taylor’s intense involvement, micro-­management and emotional investment in the canonisation cause.22 The role of Father Taylor in personally forging and fostering networks of promotion and devotional patronage within British lay and clerical circles is also beyond doubt. His energy and enthusiasm for furthering devotion to the saint knew few bounds, especially upon leaving his teaching post in 1915 for parish duties at St Francis Xavier in Carfin. An important enlistment in the task of mainstreaming devotion to Saint Thérèse was Taylor’s fellow

in Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain