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Essays on Rudyard Kipling
Editor: Jan Montefiore

This book is a collection of essays on Rudyard Kipling and brings historical, literary critical and postcolonial approaches to this perennially controversial writer. The first and fairest thing to say about Kipling is that he has borne a brilliant part in recovering the lost provinces of poetry. Kipling's morality is the morality of someone who has to prove that God is not responsible for part of the world, and that the Devil is. Kipling's imperialist opinions became more strident after the Boer War he lost the esteem of British literary intellectuals, whom he in turn despised. The book addresses Kipling's approach to the Boer war, his involvement with World War One, his Englishness and the politics of literary quotation. It demonstrates the effects of a Kipling-conditioned world on Edward Thomas, Ivor Gurney and David Jones. The book focuses on Kipling's collection of stories and accompanying poems, Actions and Reactions, which was published in October 1909. It also probes the historical subtext of the children's fable Rikki-Tikki-Tavi and Indian history, Kipling's search for God, and his longest Indian experience of footloose travel in the Native states of North India. Stalky & Co is the text of Kipling's which features the largest number of quotations. Kipling's notion of the ideally masculine 'army man' in relation to contemporary late Victorian discourses and practices of same-sex passion is analyzed. The book also addresses Kipling's views on the question of fascism, anti-Semitism and the 'doctrine of racial superiority'.

Stalky & Co.
Kaori Nagai

13 Quotations and boundaries: Stalky & Co. Kaori Nagai You ought always to verify your quotations.1 I n ‘Slaves of the Lamp, Part II’, the last story of Stalky & Co., Stalky, aka Arthur Lionel Corkran, enters the stage as a cross-cultural agent, reminiscent of Kim, the hybrid boy par excellence. Now in India as an imperial officer, he commands the full confidence of his Sikh soldiers, who call him Koran Sahib and take him to be ‘an invulnerable Guru of sorts’.2 He speaks their lan­ guage and acts as one of them, even taking them to pray at the Golden Temple

in In Time’s eye
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Jan Montefiore

‘The Village that Voted The Earth Was Flat’. The son of a couple whose courtship began by swapping quotations from Browning22 became from his mid-teens both an accomplished writer of parody, a genre whose self-conscious literariness links Victorian and modernist literature, and a brilliant stylistic magpie who borrowed as easily from music-hall songs or Lewis Carroll as from the King James Bible and Anglican hymns. The quotations in his stories, whose political implications in Stalky & Co. Kaori Nagai analyses here, very often ‘place’ their speakers’ taste, as when

in In Time’s eye
Howard J. Booth

Stalky & Co. (1899)) after hearing, in Andrew Lycett’s curiously opaque phrase, that Dunsterville’s son had ‘experienced it at his school’, This is perfectly sickening. You can imagine what the old Coll. would have been with a system of cubicles instead of the old dormitories and the masters moving about at all hours through ’em – which was what saved us. I don’t think that as the world is today the thing will count against him in the future as it would have done in our time. And yet – how many men do we know who have risen to all sorts of positions who when they were

in In Time’s eye
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Robert H. MacDonald

movement to the rear’, Sir.’ 17 For its middle-class readers, Punch mocked military doublespeak, and – at first sight – attacked flag-waving in a Board School. But was the target patriotism itself, or the inappropriateness of the subject for that particular audience? Kipling in Stalky & Co . (1899) showed that

in The language of empire
Isabel Quigly

edited Stalky & Co in the World’s Classics (OUP), and has translated about 100 books, mostly from Italian, some from Spanish and French. For a decade she was the Spectator ’s film critic and wrote Charlie Chaplin: The Early Comedies (Studio Vista; in USA, Dutton). Until recently, for 12 years, she was literary adviser to The Tablet . She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of

in British cinema of the 1950s
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Robert H. MacDonald

Imperialism and the Military 1850–1950 , Manchester, 1992, p. 9. 13 Fussell, The Great War , pp. 22–3. 14 Rudyard Kipling, Stalky & Co ., New York, 1913 , p. 305. 15 Pall Mall

in The language of empire
Robert H. MacDonald

Stalky & Co ., or with some complications, in ‘The Man Who Would Be King’. The narrative common to the frontier verses is the story of the men who come, suffer, and find their manhood on the boundaries of empire. A coda reminds the reader that their sacrifice, though what empire-building is all about, has been neglected or forgotten by those at home. Most of the verses repeat the technique of ‘The Song of

in The language of empire
Heidi Hansson

example is Thomas Hughes’s Rugby novel Tom Brown’s School Days (1857), where several of the genre characteristics are laid down, such as camaraderie, bullying endured and defeated, excelling in sports, and the importance of gentlemanly behaviour. The purpose of education is represented as identity formation and socialisation, especially in terms of class and gender as in the school depicted in Kipling’s Stalky & Co (1899) where future colonial administrators are fostered. Book learning is a minor theme, but a recurrent topic is children’s resistance to the repressive

in Irish women’s writing, 1878–1922
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John Thieme

absorption in the role. However, Graham Greene and Hamish Hamilton proposed a different title, perhaps feeling that Narayan’s intended one was too specific and in any case looking for a more literary identification that would locate what might otherwise have appeared to be an unusual item in Hamilton’s list within the recognizable subgenre of English schoolboy fiction. So the title Swami and Friends was chosen to echo Kipling’s Stalky & Co. (1899),14 a book that had retained its popularity as a juvenile classic and whose influence had already found its way into other

in R.K. Narayan