Abstract only
Author: David Brauner

This is a study of the contemporary American novelist, Philip Roth. Reading alongside a number of his contemporaries and focusing particularly on his later fiction, it offers a view of Roth as an intellectually adventurous and stylistically brilliant writer who constantly reinvents himself in surprising ways. At the heart of this book are a number of readings of Roth's works both in terms of their relationships with each other and with fiction by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thomas Pynchon, Tim O'Brien, Bret Easton Ellis, Stanley Elkin, Howard Jacobson and Jonathan Safran Foer. The book identifies as a thread running through all of Roth's work the use of paradox, both as a rhetorical device and as an organising intellectual and ideological principle.

Morality, mortality and masculinity in Sabbath’s Theater
David Brauner

article of (bad) faith. If there was something slightly desperate, even hysterical, about Portnoy’s sexual hijinks, Sabbath’s concupiscence is atavistic, the expression of a primitive comic priapism; at once a defiance and an affirmation of mortality. In this chapter, I will discuss in some detail this relationship between morality, mortality and masculinity in Sabbath’s Theater, as well as pointing out some resemblances between Roth’s novel and ‘The Guest’ (1966), a short story by one of Roth’s Jewish-American contemporaries, Stanley Elkin, and No More Mister Nice Guy

in Philip Roth
Abstract only
David Brauner

), Deception (1990) and Operation Shylock (1993), appropriates, complicates and finally parodies aspects of both realism and postmodernism, making connections between these texts and works by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thomas Pynchon, Tim O’Brien and Bret Easton Ellis. In the third chapter, I discuss Roth’s treatment of morality, mortality and masculinity in what I consider to be his masterpiece, Sabbath’s Theater (1995), comparing it with a short story by Stanley Elkin and a novel by Howard Jacobson that share many of its themes. The fourth chapter develops work that I began in

in Philip Roth
Generic experimentation in My Life as a Man, The Counterlife, The Facts, Deception and Operation Shylock
David Brauner

throughout his book Comic Sense: Reading Robert Coover, Stanley Elkin, Philip Roth (1994); Stephen Wade suggests that although ‘in Roth one may discover vestiges of realism . . . he is notoriously metafictional in The ‘credible incredible’ 49 the widest sense’ (Wade 1996: 15) and Lilian Kremer claims that ‘Roth’s best work combines Hebraic moral conscience with postmodern artifice’ (Kremer 2002: 49). Some critics see Roth’s postmodernism as a decisive shift away from the more conventional fiction of his early career: Robert M. Greenberg notes that since Zuckerman Bound

in Philip Roth