Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 60 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
The Swabian Chronicles
Author: I. S. Robinson

This book is based on a study of the Swabian chronicles undertaken for the Monumenta Germaniae Historica in Munich. Three of the most important chronicles of eleventh-century Germany were composed in the south-western duchy of Swabia. The book focuses on these three chronicles of eleventh-century Germany: the chronicle of Herman of Reichenau, the chronicle of Berthold of Reichenau and the chronicle of Bernold of St Blasien. Bernold, a clergyman of Constance, continued the work of Herman and Berthold in a text containing the fullest extant account of 1080-1100. The chronicles reveal how between 1049 and 1100 the centripetal attraction of the reform papacy became the dominant fact of intellectual life in German reformed monastic circles. The chronicle of Berthold of Reichenau, whose authorship has been debated for two centuries, survives in two versions. One is a shorter and clearly earlier version, which begins in 1054 with a report of the death of Herman of Reichenau and breaks off in mid-sentence in the annal for 1066. The second version is obviously later and much more extensive. This second version is preceded in all the manuscripts by a biography of Herman of Reichenau. The alliance between Reichenau and the papacy was mutually advantageous as long as there was an anti-Gregorian bishop of Constance.

Abstract only
Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

continuator Berthold (c. 1030–1088), and Bernold of St. Blasien, who together documented events from 1000 to 1100. These Swabian chroniclers offer vital accounts of the shifting and violent landscape of eleventh-century Germany. 7 Beyond Swabia, the eleventh-century Annals of Lambert of Hersfeld (in the medieval Duchy of Franconia) constitute the most important narrative account of political events in the kingdom of Germany in the central Middle Ages. A so-called universal history, Lambert’s Annals begin with the creation of the world and move into his own time. This is a

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
The Chronicle of Petershausen in translation

The twelfth-century Chronicle of Petershausen, composed over the course of more than thirty years, opens a rare window on the life-world of a medieval monastery as it struggles to grow and survive within tumultuous spiritual and temporal landscapes.

From its founding by St. Gebhard II of Constance as a proprietary episcopal monastery in 992 through the aftermath of the great fire that ravaged the community in 1159 and beyond, Petershausen encountered both external attacks and internal disruption and division. Across the pages of the chronicle, supra-regional clashes between emperors and popes play out at the most local level. Monks struggle against the influence of overreaching bishops. Reformers arrive and introduce new and unfamiliar customs. Tensions erupt into violence within the community. Advocates attack. Miracles, visions, and relics link the living and the dead. Through it all the anonymous chronicler struggles to find meaning amid conflict and chaos and forge connections to a distant past. Along the way, this monk enlivens his narrative with countless colorful anecdotes – sometimes amusing, sometimes disturbing – creating a history for the monastery with its own unique voice.

Intended for specialists and students alike, this volume presents the first translation into English of this fascinating text, which offers a unique glimpse into the lived experience of medieval monasticism and its interactions with the society around it.

I. S. Robinson

Margrave Henry, 11 who was rebelling against him, and destroyed very many of his fortresses. Ernest 12 was taken prisoner, while Bruno, the king’s brother, 13 and Henry escaped with difficulty and fled. Strasbourg was plundered by Duke Herman of Swabia, 14 who was in rebellion against the king, and was grievously avenged through divine intervention against the perpetrators of the crime. Reparation was made to the holy place by

in Eleventh-century Germany
T. J. H. McCarthy

. Bishop Bruno of Augsburg and Count Welf 63 fought against each other with plunder and arson . 4. The year of the Lord 1028. Duke Ernest of Swabia 64 and Count Welf came to surrender to Emperor Conrad . 65 5. The year of the Lord 1029. Bishop Bruno of Augsburg died ; 66 Eberhard succeeded him. 67 6

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest
I. S. Robinson

The king built for himself many very strongly fortified castles in the regions of Saxony and Thuringia and also unjustly seized for himself many fortifications and thus aroused the minds of many men against himself . 81 1073. Duke Rudolf of Swabia, 82 Duke Berthold of the Carinthians 83 and Duke Welf [IV] of Bavaria dissociated themselves from

in Eleventh-century Germany
Abstract only
Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

the sword. For I came to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s enemies shall be they of his own household [Matt. 10:34–36]. 2.29. In the year 1077, Duke Rudolf of Swabia 72 was made king by order of Pope Gregory and with the counsel of Duke Berthold 73 and Duke Welf of Bavaria 74 and many others of the catholic faith in the village of Forchheim. 75 Rudolf held the kingdom against Henry for three and a half years. These things marked the beginning, nay

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
I. S. Robinson

Ravensburg in Swabia), the Welf family monastery: see above p. 70 and n. 127. 25 Arnold I (1054–5) † 2 October. 26 Cf. DD.H.III 359 (Brixen, 20 November 1055), 360 (Neuburg, 10 December), 361 (Ulm, 14 December

in Eleventh-century Germany
Abstract only
Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

literature). 3 By the chronicler’s own time, the Bregenzer had become one of Swabia’s most powerful families and Petershausen’s most important patrons – surely a key reason for spinning this flattering (and thus historically unreliable) genealogy. 4 From the deep roots of this family, the chronicler moves to Gebhard’s own father, Count Ulrich VI of Bregenz (d. 950/957), referred to here by his nickname Otzo. 5 After praising Otzo for his piety and recounting certain of his miraculous works, the chronicler introduces his four sons and their descendants. Here the

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
Abstract only
Jonathan R. Lyon

the German kingdom in their opposition to Henry’s rule. With Gregory’s support, they denied Henry’s claim to the kingship and elected the duke of Swabia, Rudolf of Rheinfelden, as the new German king (or anti-king, as he is more commonly known). Henry IV survived this threat to his rule, but Rudolf’s death in 1080 did not put an end to his troubles in Saxony. 25 As The

in Noble Society