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Christian dualism originated in the reign of Constans II (641-68). It was a popular religion, which shared with orthodoxy an acceptance of scriptual authority and apostolic tradition and held a sacramental doctrine of salvation, but understood all these in a radically different way to the Orthodox Church. One of the differences was the strong part demonology played in the belief system. This text traces, through original sources, the origins of dualist Christianity throughout the Byzantine Empire, focusing on the Paulician movement in Armenia and Bogomilism in Bulgaria. It presents not only the theological texts, but puts the movements into their social and political context.

Janet Hamilton, Bernard Hamilton, and Yuri Stoyanov

Lemerle has argued that the first ninety-three chapters of Peter of Sicily’s work, which include the material about John and Paul, were based on what he had learned about the Paulicians from hearsay in Constantino-ple, but that from about chapter ninety-four onwards he was reporting what he had learned from the Paulicians themselves at Tefrice. 27 They traced their origins to Constantine of Mananalis

in Christian dualist heresies in the Byzantine world c. 650–c. 1450
Abstract only
Janet Hamilton, Bernard Hamilton, and Yuri Stoyanov

this work or the circumstances in which it was written, beyond what he himself tells us, that he was sent to negotiate the release of some prisoners held by the Paulicians at the time when Paulician territorial power was at its height. These prisoners were held at Tefrice (see map), which was then the centre of the sect. For the historical circumstances, see our

in Christian dualist heresies in the Byzantine world c. 650–c. 1450