Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 55 items for :

  • "Terence Fisher" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Author: Peter Hutchings

This book is about the British film director Terence Fisher. It begins by setting the context by detailing Fisher's directorial debut to Hammer's horror production and the importance of the Hammer horror to Fisher's career. Hammer's horror production represents one of the striking developments in post-war British cinema. The book explains some professional and industrial contexts in which Fisher operated and shows how these relate both to the films he made and the way in which these films have been judged and valued. It presents a detailed account of The Astonished Heart, Fisher's sixth film as director, highlighting the benefits and some of the problems involved in thinking about Fisher's career generally in its pre-horror phase. The successful Hammer film, The Curse of Frankenstein, both inaugurated the British horror boom and established Fisher as a film-maker whose name was known to critics as someone who specialised in the despised horror genre. After The Curse of Frankenstein, Fisher became primarily a horror director. The book presents an account of the highs and lows Fisher faced in his directorial career, highlighting his significant achievements and his box-office failures. It also shows Fisher as a director dependent on and at ease with the industrial and collaborative nature of film-making. In a fundamental sense, what value there is in Terence Fisher's work exists because of the British film industry and the opportunities it afforded Fisher, not despite the industry.

Abstract only
Peter Hutchings

Terence Fisher as someone who stood opposed to a philistine industry, I have sought to show Fisher as a director dependent on and at ease with the industrial and collaborative nature of film-making. In a fundamental sense, what value there is in Terence Fisher’s work (and I believe there is considerable value) exists because of the British film industry and the opportunities it afforded Fisher, not despite the industry. It follows that

in Terence Fisher
Abstract only
Peter Hutchings

This is a book about the British film director Terence Fisher. A prolific film-maker with fifty titles to his credit, Fisher’s last film – Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell – was released in 1974, when I was twelve. I was not old enough to see any of the horror films upon which Fisher’s reputation rests when they were first released; for a number of them, I was not even born. I have been

in Terence Fisher
Abstract only
Peter Hutchings

Career overview So far as his career in cinema was concerned, Terence Fisher was always something of a latecomer. He did not enter the film industry until he was twenty-nine years old, he did not become a film director until he was forty-three, and he did not direct his first horror film (the type of film upon which his reputation was built) until he was fifty-two. To a certain extent, he was also a

in Terence Fisher
Peter Hutchings

the film that are not identifiable in any other way. The significant thing here is how distant such a reading seems from the sort of film-making associated with Terence Fisher. Horror as a genre has often been associated with non-conventional representations of gender and has attracted film-makers who are themselves gay and/or concerned to explore same-sex desire (in terms of British film directors, one thinks of James Whale

in Terence Fisher
Peter Hutchings

pun. But it’s a good pun, because Grimm wasn’t a gentle storyteller, was he? (Terence Fisher) 1 Fisher and Hammer It is not unreasonable to think of The Curse of Frankenstein as representing Terence Fisher’s date with destiny. This enormously successful Hammer film, released in May 1957, both inaugurated the British horror boom and established Fisher as a

in Terence Fisher
Peter Hutchings

Back in the early 1950s Terence Fisher had found himself exiled to the non-prestigious support-feature sector of the British film industry, and after the 1962 box-office failure of The Phantom of the Opera his career seemed to stall for a second time. He did not work for Hammer again for nearly two years, and of the eleven post -Phantom films he would go on to direct before his effective

in Terence Fisher
Robert Murphy

Remember (1958), troubles and contradicts the idea that the most exciting and valuable part of British cinema was that which defied the realist ethos. Durgnat emerges, despite his enthusiasm for Terence Fisher’s gothic horror films and the artistically extravagant work of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, as a rationalist rather than a romantic. He had described himself seven years earlier as ‘a

in British cinema of the 1950s
Abstract only
Adapting classical myth as Gothic romance
I.Q. Hunter

According to its director, Terence Fisher, The Gorgon (1964) was not a horror film at all, but a romantic fairy tale and ‘frustrated love story’ (Ringel, 1975a : 24). Although the film is set in Hammer’s usual stylised middle Europe, the Gorgon herself derives not from Gothic literature, like Dracula and Frankenstein’s monster, but from classical mythology – unfamiliar

in Monstrous adaptations
Abstract only
Horror production
Peter Hutchings

Fisher, were still producing significant work. Neither can the films of this time be seen as simply moving on from the outmoded and inflexible certainties of previous horror productions. Instead, their relation to earlier horrors is decidedly ambivalent. Three of the major horror films produced in this period – namely The Sorcerers (Michael Reeves, 1967), Witchfinder General (Reeves, 1968) and The Devil Rides Out (Terence Fisher, 1968) – although operating from different perspectives, are

in Hammer and beyond