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Editor: Glennis Byron

The late twentieth century saw growing number of articles and books appearing on new national gothic; however, the wider context for this had not really been addressed. This collection of essays explores an emerging globalgothic useful for all students and academics interested in the gothic, in international literature, cinema, and cyberspace, presenting examples of globalgothic in the 21st-century forms. It analyses a global dance practice first performed in Japan, Ankoku butoh, and surveys the ways in which Indigenous cultures have been appropriated for gothic screen fictions. To do this, it looks at the New Zealand television series on Maori mythologies, Mataku. The unlocated 'vagabonds' of Michel Faber's "The Fahrenheit Twins" are doubles (twins) of a gothic trajectory as well as globalgothic figures of environmental change. The book considers the degree to which the online vampire communities reveal cultural homogenisation and the imposition of Western forms. Global culture has created a signature phantasmagoric spatial experience which is uncanny. Funny Games U.S. (2008) reproduces this process on the material level of production, distribution and reception. The difference between the supposedly 'primitive' local associated with China and a progressive global city associated with Hong Kong is brought out through an analysis of cannibal culture. In contemporary Thai horror films, the figure of horror produced is neither local nor global but simultaneously both. The book also traces the development, rise and decline of American gothic, and looks at one of the central gothic figures of the twenty-first century: the zombie.

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Globalising the supernatural in contemporary Thai horror film
Katarzyna Ancuta

labels foreign to the Thai language, suggesting that what we identify as Thai horror cinema evolved on its own, local terms. Still, there is no denying that the increasing globalisation of the Thai economy and, in consequence, the Thai film industry has had a strong impact on contemporary Thai horror films, affecting not only their production and distribution methods but also their themes, their

in Globalgothic
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Glennis Byron

contemporary Thai horror film’, Katarzyna Ancuta argues that the increasing globalisation of the Thai economy has had a strong impact upon Thai horror films, affecting not only their production and distribution but also their themes, tropes and narrative structures. As she demonstrates with specific reference to the phi tai hong , the spirit of the violently dead, and Sophon Sukdapisit’s 2008 debut feature

in Globalgothic